Improve company productivity with a Business Account.Sign Up

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 876
  • Last Modified:

Differentiate between function in Java and C

Please tell me the easiest way  to differentiate functions in C and Java.

Also, if a function signature is of the form  "return_type function_name()", is it is sufficient to conclude that it is a C function?

Does the function "toCharArray()" exist in C/C++?

Thanks!
0
dshrenik
Asked:
dshrenik
  • 11
  • 3
6 Solutions
 
for_yanCommented:
Java method should have in 100% of cases type in the signature or
the word "void"

If signature does not have return type unless it is cnstructor - that is C function
0
 
for_yanCommented:
Also this convention - starting word lower case - other words upper case - this is typical for Java, like toCharArray(). I guess in C standard functions
are mostly in lower case. Does not mean that someone might not write
some C funvtion folloing Java naming tradition - just one
name is not enough to guarantee that it is either C or Java
0
 
for_yanCommented:
Of course  you cannot conclude that

return_type function_name()

is always C function

there maybe any number of Java Methods
like that, say,

float my_function()

You need to have the context.

One very imporatnt difference that in Java all methods
should be within a class, whereas in C++ there may be
functions and methods not within any class

0
Free Tool: Subnet Calculator

The subnet calculator helps you design networks by taking an IP address and network mask and returning information such as network, broadcast address, and host range.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

 
for_yanCommented:

I think in C++ there is a function ToCharArray():
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.string.tochararray%28v=vs.71%29.aspx

But still toCharArra() - starting with lower case looks more like Java to me.
Of course you cannot rely on such things - no one prevents someone to
write in C function with such name
0
 
dshrenikAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the detailed explanations.

Can you tell me if "len = s.Length" is C or Java?
0
 
for_yanCommented:
if s is a string then s.length is not Java, Java would be s.length()

On the other hand if s is array, then Java will have s.length - without parentheses
0
 
for_yanCommented:
I think one simple way is to look at the top of the program - in C you'll usually
see a bunch of "include"'s, in Java - a bunch of "import"'s
0
 
dshrenikAuthor Commented:
s is an array.

Is "s.Length" in Java? (L is in caps)

I have access only to the function code...
0
 
dshrenikAuthor Commented:
Do all Java functions need the qualifier "public" / "private", etc?
0
 
for_yanCommented:
Now iit is all lower case, but it will have parentheses in the end -
this means it is a method
0
 
for_yanCommented:
No, nota ll of them need it - they have no access qualifie - that is called
"default" access - just you may write

float sqrt1(float x){...}

0
 
for_yanCommented:
it is return type which is mandatory in Java - even if returns nothing it should have "void" in frtont; I guess in C - if it returns nothing "void" is just good practice but not an error
0
 
for_yanCommented:
But one exception is that constructor in the class has no return type - but its name should be identical to the name of the class - so if compiler ebcounetrs declaration of method which has no return type and does not match exactly the class name where it finds this method - then Java compiler will report an error
0
 
CEHJCommented:
>>Is "s.Length" in Java? (L is in caps)

That looks like .NET (in which case it could be C# - as could the rest)
0
 
for_yanCommented:
.NET may apply either to C or to C#. It may be C# which is in general much closer to Java than C
Yes, in C# it really looks like length of the string is shown this way:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.string.length.aspx
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

Featured Post

Upgrade your Question Security!

Your question, your audience. Choose who sees your identity—and your question—with question security.

  • 11
  • 3
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now