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sorting an array of structs

Hi all,
Given a csv file and I need to read the data and create a sorted array of structs, each of which contains the country code, name, population and life expectancy. So i've to build an index array in memory and sort it using insertion sort and then write (country code with its offset) to a directory file where I'm able to search using the country code.
here is what I have right now, but the sorted array is not working???
#include	<stdio.h>
#include 	<string.h>
#include 	<stdlib.h>
#include 	"ourhdr.h"

typedef struct				// Country Data struct declaration
    	{  	
		char code[4]; 		// Country Code 
       		char name[50];		// Country Name
		float life_expectancy;	// Life Expentancy of the Country's citizen
		int pop;		// Country's Population
    	} DATATYPE;

typedef struct				// Index Data struct declaration
	{
		char code[4];		
		long int offset;	// offset of the data
	} INDEX;

INDEX StructArray[300];	// for a lot of them
DATATYPE ActualStruct; // for a single struct

void sort(INDEX SortArray[], int n)
{
	int j;
	for(j=0; j < n;j++)
	{
		int k;
		char *temp = SortArray[j].code;
		for (k= j-1; k >= 0; k--)
		{
			if(strcmp(SortArray[k].code, temp) >= 0)
				break;
			strcpy(SortArray[k+1].code, SortArray[k].code);
		}
		strcpy( SortArray[k+1].code,  temp); // strcpy	
	}
}

int main() 
{ 
	int i = 0;
	int size = 0;
	FILE *FI, *FO, *FO2;
	char Line[1000];  // NO input line (delimited by \n) is longer than 1000

	char * Tok;         // token from line
	if((FI = fopen("AC1.txt", "r")) == NULL) // open a stream from "countries"
    		err_sys("Open Fail\n");

	if((FO = fopen("DATABASE.txt", "wb")) == NULL) // open a stream from "countries"
    		err_sys("Open DATABASE Fail\n");

	if((FO2 = fopen("DIRECTORY.txt", "w+")) == NULL) // open a stream from "countries"
    		err_sys("Open DIRECTORY Fail\n");

    while ( fgets( (char *) Line,1000,FI) != NULL) // fill buffer up to newline or eof or error
    {

	Tok = strtok( Line ,",\n"); 	// skip ID number

        Tok = strtok( NULL ,",\n"); 	// this should get the country code 
        ActualStruct.code[0] = Tok[0];
        ActualStruct.code[1] = Tok[1];
        ActualStruct.code[2] = Tok[2];
        ActualStruct.code[3] = 0; 	// To create "string" 

	Tok = strtok( NULL ,",\n"); 	// this should get the country name 
        strncpy(&ActualStruct.name[0],Tok,50);	// copy string at most 50 chars

	Tok = strtok( NULL ,",\n"); 	// skip
	Tok = strtok( NULL ,",\n"); 	// skip 
	Tok = strtok( NULL ,",\n"); 	// skip
	Tok = strtok( NULL ,",\n"); 	// skip 

	Tok = strtok( NULL ,",\n"); 	// this should get the population
	ActualStruct.pop = atoi(Tok);	// convert string to integer

        Tok = strtok( NULL ,",\n"); 	// this one should get life expectancy
        ActualStruct.life_expectancy = atof(Tok);	// convert string to a floating point number

	strcpy(StructArray[i].code, ActualStruct.code);                  // get the current code 
	StructArray[i].offset = ftell(FO);                               // get the current offset in the DATABASE file 

	if (fwrite(&ActualStruct, sizeof(DATATYPE),1,FO) != 1)  // write the struct to the DATABASE file 
		err_sys("fwrite error");

	printf("%5s%50s%15u%18f%10u\n",&ActualStruct.code[0],&ActualStruct.name[0],ActualStruct.pop,ActualStruct.life_expectancy,StructArray[i].offset);

	i++;
	size = i;
	}
	
	printf("Before Sort:\n");
	for (i=0; i<size; i++)
	{
		printf("%s \t %u\n",StructArray[i].code, StructArray[i].offset);
	}	
	
	sort(StructArray,sizeof(StructArray)/sizeof(*StructArray));	// call sort function
	
	printf("After Sort:\n");
	for (i=0; i<size; i++)
	{	
		printf("%s \t %u\n",StructArray[i].code, StructArray[i].offset);
	}

	if (fclose(FI))				// close file descriptor FI
		err_sys("Close error\n");	
	if (fclose(FO))				// close file descriptor FO
		err_sys("Close error\n");	
	if (fclose(FO2))			// close file descriptor FO2
		err_sys("Close error\n");

    	printf("------THE END------ \n");  // and this if not error :) 

}

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Output:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CODE    COUNTRY NAME         POPULATION      LIFE EXPECTANCY    OFFSET
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DZA                                           Algeria       31471000         69.699997         0
  AGO                                            Angola       12878000         38.299999        64
  BEN                                             Benin        6097000         50.200001       128
  BWA                                          Botswana        1622000         39.299999       192
  IOT                    British Indian Ocean Territory              0          0.000000       256
  BFA                                      Burkina Faso       11937000         46.700001       320
  BDI                                           Burundi        6695000         46.200001       384
Before Sort:
DZA      0
AGO      64
BEN      128
BWA      192
IOT      256
BFA      320
BDI      384
After Sort:
DZA      0
AGO      64
AGO      128
AGO      192
AGO      256
AGO      320
AGO      384
------THE END------

what i want is something like that:
After Sort:
AGO    64
BD1     384
BFA     320
...and so on

any help will be greatly apreciated:)
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crazy4s
Asked:
crazy4s
  • 11
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  • 4
2 Solutions
 
TommySzalapskiCommented:
Your sort function has one major issue that I can see.
You are only copying the code. The rest of the data is staying in its original place. (You need to copy everything, maybe you need a function?)

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crazy4sAuthor Commented:
yes i know previously i've checked it using gdb but I dunno how to solve it? can you give some example?
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TommySzalapskiCommented:
Something like
//const because the source should not change, & so that the changes will stay
//(look up 'pass by reference' for more info.
void datatypeCopy(DATATYPE& dst, const DATATYPE& src)
{
  strcpy(dest.name, src.name);
  strcpy(dest.code, src.code);
  dest.life_expectancy = src.life_expectancy;
  dest.pop = src.pop;
}

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crazy4sAuthor Commented:
can you elaborate more in details on this and how/where i should use it?
I'm kind of slow in understanding stuffs. thank you:)
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phoffricCommented:
Tommy has pointed out one problem, but there are several.

Here's a fact that you may not realize.

If you have two struct objects, x and y, then if you say:
    x = y;
then the entire contents of y are copied into x.

The only other c-syntax item that you may need help on is strcmp:
    http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstring/strcmp/
In particular, read carefully the section on Return Value.
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crazy4sAuthor Commented:
yes i understand this as if
SortArray[k] > SortArray[j]
then SortArray[k+1] = SortArray[k]
        SortArray[k] = SortArray[j]
am i right?
yes and i know i should copy the whole DATATYPE struct into INDEX struct(but only show the country code and its offset) but i dunno how should i write it out? i'm really weak at this:(
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phoffricCommented:
>> am i right?
Well, as long as you understand that the '>' operator does not apply to your INDEX type, and that you meant something close to that, then, yes, you are right.

So, assuming that we're all on the same page as to the understanding of the algorithm, I urge you to write down the following table on paper for the values that you expect on line 32 in your OP. Here's the header of this table:
j      k     SortArray[k].code      SortArray[j].code    Next-LOC

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Next-LOC is the next line of code that you want to execute (i.e., either 33 or 34).

This table will have multiple entries for j since j is in the outer loop.

Then, go through the debugger and verify that your expectation is correct. Don't be surprised if you are surprised by what you find.

BTW - you don't have to do this for every possibilty of j,k pairs. It should only take a few entries for you to discover your problem.

You may also be surprised about some the first entry, which I find a bit odd (and I'd take off a point or two), but which still works algorithmically.
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phoffricCommented:
wait..
>> then SortArray[k+1] = SortArray[k]     // ok
>>        SortArray[k] = SortArray[j]           // did you really mean j here?

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phoffricCommented:
Will be back tonight. Hopefully, you and Tommy will have this wrapped up. There isn't much more I can say about the sort since there are only a few lines of code in it. If I say anything more, then I'd be writing it for you, and you would lose the benefit of going through the critical discipline of learning how to debug algorithms yourself.
    Good Luck!
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crazy4sAuthor Commented:
let's say now temp is BEN (j=2) so if
DZA(k=1) > BEN(j=2)
then k+1=k so now DZA(k=2)
and then compare again k--
AGO(k=0)>BEN(j=2)
IS NOT BIGGER, so fail get out of the loop and k+1 which is now (k=1) = BEN(j=2)
and the list is AGO(k=0),BEN(k=1),DZA(k=2) and so on....

i edit the sort function, i think is easier to understand
void sort(INDEX SortArray[], int n)
{
	int j;
	for(j=0; j < n;j++)
	{
		int k;
		char *temp = SortArray[j].code;
		k = j-1;
		while (strcmp(SortArray[k].code, temp) >= 0 && k>=0)
		{
			strcpy(SortArray[k+1].code, SortArray[k].code);
			k = k - 1;
		}
		strcpy( SortArray[k+1].code,  temp);
	}
}

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but i still can't understand the func that tommy provide?
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TommySzalapskiCommented:
It's designed to work just like the strcpy function except it copies the whole struct instead of just a string. You would call it just like you would call strcpy except you would pass the entire struct to it. I didn't test it or anything. It was meant more as a guide but I think it will work exactly as posted.
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crazy4sAuthor Commented:
but where should i call this function? in the main after the sort() or in the sort function?
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TommySzalapskiCommented:
Any time you want to copy one of your structs. So it would be in the sort fuction and would replace the strcpy lines.

I was assuming you understood the code you had. Now I'm not completely sure. Did you write and understand it or did you get it from someone else?
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crazy4sAuthor Commented:
well the sort function was written through the algorithm given on the net and the while loop is given by the lecturer... and i added stuffs by stuffs slowly through questions at here to get till this code!

hmm so you meant that I've to call the whole datatypeCopy() func in that line //
void sort(INDEX SortArray[], int n)
{
	int j;
	for(j=0; j < n;j++)
	{
		int k;
		char *temp = SortArray[j].code;
		k = j-1;
		while (strcmp(SortArray[k].code, temp) >= 0 && k>=0)
		{
			strcpy(SortArray[k+1].code, SortArray[k].code); //replacing this whole line with that func???
			k = k - 1;
		}
		strcpy( SortArray[k+1].code,  temp); //replacing this whole line with that func???
	}
}

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hmm sorry i'm really trying out my best to understand what you all trying to say but i'm really slow in understanding things!
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TommySzalapskiCommented:
Okay. I'll give you the function and explain it. Make sure to read the comments and understand them. I will leave the testing and debugging to you. First, you actually need a function to copy the INDEX type. You may want the other function but you need this one for sure.
 
//const because the source should not change, & so that the changes will stay
//(look up 'pass by reference' for more info.
void indexCopy(DATATYPE& dst, const DATATYPE& src)
{
  strcpy(dest.code, src.code);
  dest.offset = src.offset;
} 

void sort(INDEX SortArray[], int n)
{
	int j;
	for(j=0; j < n;j++)
	{
		int k;
		INDEX temp; //Create a blank index data object
                                           indexCopy(temp, SortArray[j]); //copy the data from the current line
		k = j-1;
		while (strcmp(SortArray[k].code, temp.code) >= 0 && k>=0)
		{
			indexCopy(SortArray[k+1], SortArray[k]); //Now move them over
			k = k - 1;
		}
		indexCopy(SortArray[k+1],  temp);//And move the temp one back in
	}
} 

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crazy4sAuthor Commented:
hmm now i understand more about the func.. but why in the indexCopy () func you use DATAYPE struct instead of INDEX struct?
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TommySzalapskiCommented:
Oops. Good call. That's just a mistake. I missed it on the copy/paste. I also used dest instead of dst in one place.
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crazy4sAuthor Commented:
yeah i changed that too...hmm but i got an error on this line
void indexCopy(INDEX& dest, const INDEX& src) <-- syntax error before '&' token
and before that i defined INDEX dest, src; <-- is it correct to define like that because i got an error of not declaring dest and src?
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TommySzalapskiCommented:
No. It's not recognizing the word INDEX. Make sure this function is after the definition of the struct.
Do not declare dest and src anywhere else.
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crazy4sAuthor Commented:
#include	<stdio.h>
#include 	<string.h>
#include 	<stdlib.h>
#include 	"ourhdr.h"

typedef struct				// Country Data struct declaration
    	{  	
		char code[4]; 		// Country Code 
       		char name[50];		// Country Name
		float life_expectancy;	// Life Expentancy of the Country's citizen
		int pop;		// Country's Population
    	} DATATYPE;

typedef struct				// Index Data struct declaration
	{
		char code[4];		
		long int offset;	// offset of the data
	} INDEX;

INDEX dest, src;
INDEX StructArray[300];	// for a lot of them
DATATYPE ActualStruct; // for a single struct


void indexCopy(INDEX& dest, const INDEX& src)
{
  strcpy(dest.code, src.code);
  dest.offset = src.offset;
} 

void sort(INDEX SortArray[], int n)
{
	int j;
	for(j=0; j < n;j++)
	{
		int k;
		INDEX temp; //Create a blank index data object
                indexCopy(temp, SortArray[j]); //copy the data from the current line
		k = j-1;
		while (strcmp(SortArray[k].code, temp.code) >= 0 && k>=0)
		{
			indexCopy(SortArray[k+1], SortArray[k]); //Now move them over
			k = k - 1;
		}
		indexCopy(SortArray[k+1], temp);//And move the temp one back in
	}
}

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like this ryte?
hmm but i'm getting an error
as2.c:42: error: syntax error before '&' token
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crazy4sAuthor Commented:
the error is pointing at this line
void indexCopy(INDEX& dest, const INDEX& src)
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TommySzalapskiCommented:
Oh. I think I see the problem.
First: Take out the INDEX dest, src; line.
Then (for both structs) try defining them like this
struct INDEX				// Index Data struct declaration
	{
		char code[4];		
		long int offset;	// offset of the data
	}; //Don't forget this semicolon. It needs to be here.

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That's the only thing that looks fishy. Otherwise, I don't see why you should get that error.
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TommySzalapskiCommented:
Wait. Is this C or C++. If it's C (not C++ then the pass by reference won't work and you need to do it like this.
#include	<stdio.h>
#include 	<string.h>
#include 	<stdlib.h>
#include 	"ourhdr.h"

typedef struct				// Country Data struct declaration
    	{  	
		char code[4]; 		// Country Code 
       		char name[50];		// Country Name
		float life_expectancy;	// Life Expentancy of the Country's citizen
		int pop;		// Country's Population
    	} DATATYPE;

typedef struct				// Index Data struct declaration
	{
		char code[4];		
		long int offset;	// offset of the data
	} INDEX;

INDEX StructArray[300];	// for a lot of them
DATATYPE ActualStruct; // for a single struct


void indexCopy(INDEX* dest, INDEX src)
{
  strcpy(dest->code, src.code);
  dest->offset = src.offset;
} 

void sort(INDEX SortArray[], int n)
{
	int j;
	for(j=0; j < n;j++)
	{
		int k;
		INDEX temp; //Create a blank index data object
                indexCopy(&temp, SortArray[j]); //copy the data from the current line
		k = j-1;
		while (strcmp(SortArray[k].code, temp.code) >= 0 && k>=0)
		{
			indexCopy(&SortArray[k+1], SortArray[k]); //Now move them over
			k = k - 1;
		}
		indexCopy(&SortArray[k+1], temp);//And move the temp one back in
	}
} 

Open in new window

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crazy4sAuthor Commented:
I'm using C! oh yeah previously i was having the same prob too of using . instead of -> what are the difference actually? r both mean the same?
anyway i've successfully sorted out!
great thanks!
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TommySzalapskiCommented:
. and -> are very different.
It's a little technical, but it would be good to understand.
You use the . if you have the actual struct. You use the -> if you have a pointer.
So
INDEX x;
x.code;

INDEX* x;
x->code;

When you use * then the variable is just an address that points to where the data really is. Look up pointers if you want. They are very useful but easy to cause weird errors with.
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