script to run dig using a file input

Hello,

I am using dig -f ( -f means a file name) which I have a list if zones. like
test.com
hello.com
foo.com
foobar.com
help.us

It runs fine but I only want to know if a certain NS record exists. For example wan.rich.com if that criteria matches create a file with the domain name and NS record.

If wan.rich.com is not part of the NS record then output a file with the zone name and the NS record

example

Zone name:                        NS Record                      
test.com                             wan.rich.com
foo.com                              att.ttl.com

Report 2

All zones that have wan.rich.com are:

foo.com
apple1.com
box.com

is there a grep or sed command to go through the file to show me?

I tried grep -i wan.rich.com output.txt

I get a response 3 times for each zone meaning duplicates cause there are wan.rich.com,  1.wan.rich.com, 2.wan.rich.com and 3.wan.rich.com for each zone name

Each domain has these 3 entries, I just want to know per domain. I dont want to end up with a report that has 3 same domains for each NS record.

Thanks



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richsarkAsked:
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Fairlight2cxCommented:
I'd do it in perl and every time I found an NS record that matched the selection criterion, I'd store the results in an array.  Then just spit out the array for the report section.

If the report had to handle multiple criterion, I'd use a hash with each match criterion as the key for the hash, and push onto an array the values for those keys.  (Hash of arrays.)
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woolmilkporcCommented:
How about

egrep  -i '([^\.]wan|^wan).rich.com'

wmp
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richsarkAuthor Commented:
Hello woolmilkporc:

Its not working. I am not sure how to run it.

egrep  -i '([^\.]wan|^wan)test.txt'
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richsarkAuthor Commented:
Hello Fairlight2cx:,

Do you have this script that I can test on?
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woolmilkporcCommented:
egrep  -i '([^\.]wan|^wan)test.txt' output.txt
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richsarkAuthor Commented:
Hi woolmilkporc:

Well, I must be a dunce, i did egrep  -i '([^\.]wan|^wan)test.txt' output.txt

may I know what is test.txt?
output.txt contains the data I want to grep on right?
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woolmilkporcCommented:
OK,

I inadvertently copied the line from your comment and overlooked your test.txt. You put it there, so I don't know what it is.

egrep  -i '([^\.]wan|^wan).rich.com' output.txt

Yes, "output.txt contains the data I want to grep on".

The statement does nothing else than grepping for "wan.rich.com" without the dot "." in front, so "1.wan.rich.com" or the like will not be found.
The string following the pipe "|" takes care to find "wan.rich.com" at the start of a line as well.  
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Perl

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