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How to check the keysize of private/public key?

Posted on 2011-02-20
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
Hello, I have a paired private/public key.. I would like to know what key strength I am using. Whether it is 1024 or 2048 bit, please let me know how can I check it using openssl command.

Is is always true that if a private key is of 1024 bit then public key would be also 1024 bit? Thanks!
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Question by:beer9
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by:chqshaitan
ID: 34939432
what package did you create the key with?
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by:beer9
ID: 34940660
I am not sure.. But I have public/private key pair but I think it was openssl
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by:chqshaitan
chqshaitan earned 250 total points
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by:Dave Howe
ID: 34949438
on windows? just look at the certificate in certificate manager and under "public key" it will tell you the key size (firefox offers similar views of the certificate)
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by:Dave Howe
ID: 34949443
note if you have the certificate as a cer file (or .pem) You can just double click it in windows to get the same view.
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by:beer9
ID: 34987047
I see information like below as the output of "openssl x509 -in 1.pem -noout -text | less", so does it mean that it is 1024 bit? what is the difference of Modulus and Public key. Are they both same? Thanks!

            Public Key Algorithm: rsaEncryption
            RSA Public Key: (1024 bit)
                Modulus (1024 bit):

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Dave Howe earned 250 total points
ID: 34991871
They are effectively the same.

an rsa key consists of two parts, a public exponent (usually 65537 for most ssl certs) and a modulus (which is what is usually considered "keysize" as it is the product of the secretly generated primes that form the secret key)
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by:beer9
ID: 35036347
Thank you! :-)
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