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Speed on Wireless N Connection

Hello,

I am using TP-link TL-WR1043ND wireless N gigabit router.  When I made wireless connection on my Dell Latitude E4300 laptop (with Intel WiFi Link 5100 adapter, using WPA2-PSK),  it can only connect at 130MB.  It doesn't seems trying to connect at 300MB.  I checked on the router, the max transfer rate was already set to 300MB.  Is there any additional setting required?

Many thanks.
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ICKW
Asked:
ICKW
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9 Solutions
 
enachemcCommented:
connection speed is highly dependent on the signal strength and quality
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ICKWAuthor Commented:
I just tested it beside the router though.  The signal should be strong though.
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woolnoirCommented:
Do you have any other WIFI networks in range ? the 300mbps bandwidth relies on having 2 receive channels to provide the 300mbps... if you're contending for the frequency space that may explain the issues you are receiving.

Have you tried changing the channel setting on the router ?
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ICKWAuthor Commented:
I can see it only ask for 1 channel on the router, how to set 2 channels?

Thanks.
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JordanlcnCommented:
As woolnoir said it requires 2 receive channels.  That you cannot set/configure. The N Setting of the router should be doing that automatically.  What woolnoir is saying is that there might be another wireless source/network in range of your area and is contending with the frequency.  Since most wireless runs on the same frequency routers uses a unique channel id to separate itself from the rest.

Just try changing the channel of your router from 1 to whatever if it increases bandwidth.  If not report back and lets try something else.  If it does please see note below.


NOTE: If this helps please credit woolnoir with the solution.
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ICKWAuthor Commented:
Yah.. I tried different channels though... it sometimes even worst.. and only connect for 54MB.
Getting exhausted....

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cicloideCommented:
Intel talks about OS limitations too "Up to 2X greater range enabled by 1x2 Draft-N implementations with 1 transmit spatial stream and 2 receive spatial streams. Up to 5X Bandwidth increase based on the theoretical maximum receive bandwidth enabled by 1x2       
Draft-N implementations with 1 transmit spatial stream and 2 receive spatial streams. Actual wireless throughput and/or range will vary depending on your specific operating system, hardware and software       
configurations. Check with your PC manufacturer for details."
In the other hand, it looks like you need 3 clear channels to do that. That means pretty much the whole 2.4G band for yourself. If there is any interference in the air that band is likely to be discarded and the 300Mb connection aborted to switch to a lower speed.
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rfc1180Commented:
You are more than likely not using 40Mhz channels, which is required for a 300Mbps connection:

http://www.intel.com/support/wireless/wlan/sb/cs-025393.htm

Check the "Fat Channel Intolerant" if you not already.

Fat Channel Intolerant
This setting communicates to surrounding networks that this Wi-Fi adapter is not tolerant of 40MHz channels in the 2.4GHz band. The default setting is for this to be disabled (turned off) so that the adapter does not send this notification.

Billy
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kdearingCommented:
Using 40MHz channels in the 2.4GHz range would require using 9 of the 11 available channels (in the US).

The chances of all those frequqncies being clear of interference and other wifi? Pretty slim.

And don't forget the overhead. The troughput you see is typically 1/2 of the raw throughput.
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cicloideCommented:
Remember that the channels overlap. If I am right, you can get up to 3 channels with minimum overlap in the 2.4GHz band. That is why I think you would require a clear spectrum to reach the use of 3 channels simultaneously.
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rfc1180Commented:
>would require a clear spectrum to reach the use of 3 channels simultaneously.
in aspects to 802.1g and 802.11n 20Mhz (150Mbps), but not with 40Mhz. His concern is getting the full 300Mbps throughput which requires at least 40Mhz channel spacing which is what kdearing has pointed out.

Billy
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ICKWAuthor Commented:
I tried to change it to 40MHz on the router though.... However, it's still the same.......
Is there any specific setting required on the Intel WiFi 5100 adapter?  I checked the spec and it should support up to 300MB though.....

Thanks all for the input.
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kdearingCommented:
As we've said, given the overhead and the inevitable existence of interference and other wifi signals...
You seeing 130Mbps throughput is pretty good.

Unless you live out in the middle of nowhere (no other 2.4GHz signals), I doubt you'll get any better.
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ICKWAuthor Commented:
I'm not sure what the real throughput is though..... I just see the wireless connection status and it shows 120MB - 130MB.  Also, this is my first time using N.  I want to know whether I'm really connecting the 300MB or 150MB though...
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rfc1180Commented:
> I want to know whether I'm really connecting the 300MB or 150MB though...
If it shows 150Mbps, then you are connected at 300Mbps, the task manager network properties or other properties are going to only indicate full duplex speed and not aggregate.

Billy

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ICKWAuthor Commented:
How can I test the aggregate speed?
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rfc1180Commented:
set up 2 wireless hosts, download jperf and setup on as a server and the other as a client and test using UDP.

http://sourceforge.net/projects/jperf/

Billy
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