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SQL Query builder for Access 2003 run-time licence

Posted on 2011-02-21
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
One of my clients is using a a database under a run-time version of Access.  However, they now need to build their own SQL queries.  Unfortunately, they do not have a full copy of Access in the building, which gives us two options:

1) I could build a basic query builder (may take a couple of days, so would like to avoid if possible)
or
2) Is there something out there already that I can use / purchase?

Any suggestions would be welcome?
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Question by:Andy Brown
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by:MINDSUPERB
MINDSUPERB earned 250 total points
ID: 34942590
I may opt to the first option. You may not find a third party query builder that would be compatible with the Access runtime version.

Sincerely,
Ed
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by:Andy Brown
ID: 34942624
Thanks Ed - appreciate your feedback.
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE ) earned 250 total points
ID: 34942874
There are several 3rd party items that can work with Access, but I believe they're all external tools. In other words, your client would launch the tools and connect to the Access database, then work from there.

They couldn't store the queries in Access using those methods - you'd have to provide this functionality if needed.

Using 3rd party tools also puts you at the mercy of the developer of that tool. If your client needs added functionality the tool doesn't provide, you're often back to square one.
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Author Closing Comment

by:Andy Brown
ID: 34942933
Thanks guys - I think I'll build my own.
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LVL 84
ID: 34943870
I think that's your best solution. It can be tricky, so be careful. I've done something crudely similar, and what I found was this:

1) Make SURE That you trap UPDATES and DELETES to insure they user knows exactly what is going on. The simplest way is to use the InStr function to check the entire SQL statement entered by the user for the words "UPDATE" and "DELETE". If you find them, make sure the user knows that this will permanently alter/delete the data, and there is no "recycle bin" attached.

2) You'll not be able to mimic the Query Designer in Access i.e. the drag-drop features for linking tables, selecting tables, etc. They'll likely ask for that, so be sure to let them know up front that it's not viable on the Access platform.

3) Users have no real concept of a JOIN, so you might consider including several pre-defined JOINed queries they can use for their base tables in their queries.

4) Users generally don't know much about WHERE clauses and the difference between AND and OR in those clauses. There's not much you can do except provide guidance for this.
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Author Comment

by:Andy Brown
ID: 34943979
Great advice as always - Thanks LSM - hope you are keeping well.
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