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application installation on Windows Terminal Service and admin rights

I am dealing with a situation where we are installing an application on a Terminal Server. The vendor says that in order for the application to work correctly it has to be installed under administrator and the users have to have full permissions at the root of the C drive.  I am not prepared to argue with the vendor so I am proceeding with their demands and am taking the caution of putting the application on a separate TS. However, I would like to know how I could go about digging up exactly what rights are really required as I believe the vendor is not interested in fine-tuning - he just wants things to be over with quickly.
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lineonecorp
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lineonecorp
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ChopperCenturyCommented:
That is what technicians in support lines generally always do if they really do not understand their own product. I would ask the vendor for another engineer as only they can tell you what is needed for sure.
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lineonecorpAuthor Commented:
I know a few tricks  about getting vendor support so that's not what I'm after here. I'm after some techniques and tips - it's not the first time I've had vendors use these lines.

For instance, when the vendor says the program has to be installed under the admin ID?  Why not admin equivalent? Why not PowerUser? All I can think of is that the installation program has been written in such a way that it wants to write to the 'admin' account profile when it installs - do programs actually get written that way?

Or when the application and users needs access to the root of the C drive?  Has the program really been written so that the user ends up creating files in the root of the C drive? Or is it that there is an install path and saving path built into the program so that all installs/savings are to be done to c:\folder1\..... If that's the case then is there a way I can change the permissions so that the path will work even if the user doesn't have rights to the root of the path?

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lineonecorpAuthor Commented:
Any more feedback?
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Carl WebsterCommented:
That is when you use Process Monitor and Process Explorer to see what fails when run as a regular user.  Then you give the rights needed to the specific registry keys and folder/files.
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