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Exchange Server on Server 2008 R2 added to an existing 2003 Domain

Posted on 2011-02-21
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I have a running server 2003 as AD. I recently Ordered a new Server 2008 R2 to run Exchange 2010, but it has resulted on a much harder task (for me) I'm a software engineer so Networking is a little hard but not impossible I hope. If someone could point me in the right direction I'm willing to read and follow the guide as close as possible.
My first questions:
1. How do I join or add a server 2008 R2 to an existing 2003 AD? (Is this good bad?, should I upgrade my first Server to 2008 R2 First?)
2. I know I have to configure an Static IP for the server, but where Do I get the IP from? I have found a lot of videos that shows who to get to the screens but where do I get that number from?
3. What roles Do I need on my server 2008 R2 to handle exchange and on which Order should I install them?
I guess once I figure out this I can ask more questions.
Thank you.

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Question by:C1950S
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Lee W, MVP earned 2000 total points
ID: 34948805
1.  Join it as you would any other workstation.  There it nothing special with having a server running 2008 R2 in a 2003 AD Domain.
2.  Your network should be using a private IP internally and if you are adding Exchange for the first time, you need to contact you ISP and get yourself assigned a Static IP for e-mail delivery.
3.  You DO NOT want to make it a DC.  Other than that, you'll need IIS, but Exchange should tell you the requirements when you install it.
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by:C1950S
ID: 34948867
1.  Join it as you would any other workstation.  There it nothing special with having a server running 2008 R2 in a 2003 AD Domain.
OK I can do that.
2.  Your network should be using a private IP internally and if you are adding Exchange for the first time, you need to contact you ISP and get yourself assigned a Static IP for e-mail delivery.
We have a set of static IPs. like 15 of which we are only using 3, Do I need another one just for email (it is different some how?) or can I use one of the ones we already have and are not using? I'll try this firs thing in the morning.
3.  You DO NOT want to make it a DC.  Other than that, you'll need IIS, but Exchange should tell you the requirements when you install it.
OK, I'll Install exchange and follow Instructions. Pending on point 2 comments
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Assisted Solution

by:Lee W, MVP
Lee W, MVP earned 2000 total points
ID: 34948936
Basically, you need A public IP with port 25 redirected to the server.  For services such as OWA, POP3, Outlook Anywhere, you would need other ports.  If you have public IPs and can afford to do so, I would use a dedicated public IP for a dedicated Exchange server.

It's not clear to me, but basically, you want to configure your Firewall to translate the public IP to the private IP you assign the server.
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by:Glen Knight
ID: 35308327
This question has been classified as abandoned and is being closed as part of the Cleanup Program. See my comment at the end of the question for more details.
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