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Using Switched Ethernet & Keeping MPLS as a backup.

Posted on 2011-02-22
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Last Modified: 2013-11-13
Hello, Our network currently consist of 30+ remote offices all using MPLS to connect to our Headquarters. We want to use Switched Ethernet & keep the existing MPLS as a backup. has anyone done this?   I am mainly wondering how we would maintain the routes for the MPLS network if that WAN link went down.  We use BGP and EIGRP.
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Question by:wymanda
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asavener earned 500 total points
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As long as you have interfaces on your routers to support the additional connections, it shouldn't be a problem.

You will need to adjust the routing metrics so that the new switched ethernet connections are preferred above the MPLS connections.
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by:wymanda
ID: 34960050
Thanks (asavener) I understand precisely what you have said in your reply.  That was already part of my design so the reassurance is great.  The issue that I really need to understand though is what happens to all the EIGRP learned routes from the MPLS connected interface if that link were to go down.  The Switched Ethernet WAN connection will become the primary, but lets assume that both interfaces are ok and that my routing table is complete.  Next lets assume the MPLS WAN link goes down long enough that the Routes are removed, then the Switched Ethernet Link goes down, and the MPLS connected interface comes back up.   The Router will need some time to repopulate the routing table with BGP neighbor associations and learned EIGRP routes.  This could take some time.  There must be a way to modify the config so that the time frame that the EIGRP routes remain in the routing table are sufficient enough to cover this scenario.
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by:asavener
asavener earned 500 total points
ID: 34960806
The process you are describing is called "convergence".  Every routing protocol takes some time to converge the routes when the topology changes.  If you need faster convergence, then you should probably consider a link-state routing protocol such as OSPF.

If site A has two connections to site B, then the topology table for the routing protocol should have both routes.  When the primary connection goes down, the routing protocol may wait briefly to see if it's just a missed hello packet, but it will then remove the failed route and start using the secondary route.
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by:harbor235
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So I understand, are you saying you will use a layer2 service like VPLS or L2TPv3?  

harbor235 ;}
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by:wymanda
ID: 35027410
harbor235:
"So I understand, are you saying you will use a layer2 service like VPLS or L2TPv3?"  

(Yes) the Switched Ethernet Service provide by Verizon uses these services.  They refer to it as "EVPL" Ethernet Virtual Private Line.  Much like PVC's and Frame Relay, Verizon's EVPL Metro service uses "EVC's" Ethernet Virtual Circuits.
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by:Qlemo
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This question has been classified as abandoned and is being closed as part of the Cleanup Program. See my comment at the end of the question for more details.
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