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How do I countif a range of cells that is not adjacent?

Several Excel functions require you to have the RANGE or Array of cells be adjancent to each other (A1:A6)....what if my Range or Array is A1, A6, A8, A9, etc.?

I don't want to create a named range for all 400 rows....which is what I am looking at now...

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ContechBridge
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ContechBridge
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barry houdiniCommented:
The answer might differ depending on the function. COUNTIF, for instance won't even allow you to use a named range if that range is made up of non-adjacent cells.

Is there a pattern, e.g. every 3rd cell? You can then write a formula to count "x" only within every third cell, or simpler, if you have an adjacent column which somehow identifies which rows are included then you can use a SUMPRODUCT or COUNTIFS function

regards, barry
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ContechBridgeAuthor Commented:
I want to find the MIN of the following cells that DO NOT contain "0"

Q6,S6,U6,AA6,AG6,AM6,AS6
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barry houdiniCommented:
Assuming that those cells are either blank or contain positive numbers try

=LARGE((Q6,S6,U6,AA6,AG6,AM6,AS6),(Q6>0)+(S6>0)+(U6>0)+(AA6>0)+(AG6>0)+(AM6>0)+(AS6>0))

[I know it uses LARGE but it still finds the MIN non zero]

obviously that isn't a viable approach for a large number of cells - for that I think you'd have to use data in another row, e.g. if row 5 for each of those cells (i.e. the cell above) shows an "x" then you could use an array formula like

=SMALL(IF(Q6:AS6>0,IF(Q5:AS5="x",Q6:AS6)),1)

confirmed with CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER

regards, barry
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ContechBridgeAuthor Commented:
Forgive my ignorance here but, just adding the "()" to the range of non adjancent cells makes it the LARGE function work with non adjacent cells...?

Everything after that is just defining the "K" criteria?
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byundtCommented:
The parentheses are actually the Union operator. Some (but far from all) functions will work on a union of non-contiguous cells. This union is then treated as a single parameter--a range (with multiple areas)--by the union-savvy functions. So in barryhoudini's suggested LARGE formula, (Q6,S6,U6,AA6,AG6,AM6,AS6) is the union of the seven cells.

Excel also has an Intersection operator--which is the space character. So A1:A6 A3:D4 would return the intersection of those two ranges: cells A3 and A4. Once again, not all functions are intersection-savvy.

Brad
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