Where do I check to see what dns server my 2003 server is pointing to.

I have a 2003 domain controller that is running as a DNS server also. Now in the DNS gui where can I find what dns servers this DC points to to get it's updates?
rdefinoAsked:
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woolnoirConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Yes, your DC needs to be pointing at something valid ideally. Clients will have your DC set as their DNS servers, anything your DC doesnt know about will be forwarded to the values in the screen above, or the ROOT servers. If you have invalid DNS servers on the forwarding tab it can cause isssues.
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Paul MacDonaldDirector, Information SystemsCommented:
It's unlikely your DC is a secondary server, so you probably want to know what forwarders are configured for it.  If you right-click on the server in DNS management and select Properites, you'll get the properties dialog for the server.  Then all you have to do is select the Forwarders tab.
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Paul MacDonaldDirector, Information SystemsCommented:
If it's actually a secondary server for a zone, you can right-click on that zone and select the properties for it.  On the properties dialog, select the Start of Authority tab to see the primary server.
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rdefinoAuthor Commented:
I have looked at that and found 3 ip's configured there. No in that window it says: "Forwarders are servers that can resolve DNS queries not answered by this server"

To me that sounds like the DC is a DNS server.   am I reading that wrong?
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rdefinoAuthor Commented:
In the start of Authority tab, it shows this DC as the primary server.
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woolnoirCommented:
The DC will be a DNS server and it will do one of two things, either use the root servers for resolution, or it will have a server configured to forward requests to.
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rdefinoAuthor Commented:
Ok, cool. So is the forwarders location where I would find what other DNS is would point to?
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Paul MacDonaldDirector, Information SystemsCommented:
RIght - that's what I'm saying.  The DC is a primary/Active DIrectory Integrated server, not a secondary server.  It doesn't get it's updates from anyone.

Now, it's possible you have DHCP running on the network, and that can update DNS with client IP information.  And of course, it's always possible for a human to change entries...
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woolnoirCommented:
DNS
get this screen by going in Admin Tools -> DNS, right click on DNS server, properties and click the forwarding tab. If there are no forwarders it will use the root dns servers, else it will use the forwarding ones.
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woolnoirCommented:
@paulmacd

>RIght - that's what I'm saying.  The DC is a primary/Active DIrectory Integrated server, not a secondary server.  It doesn't get it's updates from anyone.

a DC always (providing its internet connected) gets updates (for caching) from somewhere, its either root servers or its forwarding servers (which it obtains resolves and caches).
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Paul MacDonaldConnect With a Mentor Director, Information SystemsCommented:
Forwarders are where requests are sent the local DNS server can't resolve itself.  And administrator defines the forwarders (if any).
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rdefinoAuthor Commented:
Ok, I think I got it. Basically I was told a DNs server in our environment is going away so I need to check if my dc is pointing to it.
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Paul MacDonaldDirector, Information SystemsCommented:
I took the OP to mean client updates.  That is, I took the OP to be misconstruing his AD DNS server for a secondary zone (that was recieving updates from a primary server).  I may be wrong.
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rdefinoAuthor Commented:
Thanks guys. I got it. Thank again for the info.
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woolnoirCommented:
No worries rdefino :)
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