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best practices for server room temperatures.

Posted on 2011-02-22
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Last Modified: 2012-06-27
what's the best temperature to keep a server room at? I'm involved in a little debate over that. thanks.
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Question by:knfitz
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XLITS earned 125 total points
ID: 34953946
We have always kept our server room at 65 degrees and it seems to be fine.  This has been our policy for the past 10 years and haven't had any issues relating to temperature.
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by:KCarney81
KCarney81 earned 125 total points
ID: 34953966
60-65 usually does the trick
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by:woolnoir
woolnoir earned 125 total points
ID: 34954055
65F +- about 5F it depends on your 'green' requirements as obviously a cooler temp uses more energy and has a bigger environmental impact (and cost).
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by:David Kroll
David Kroll earned 125 total points
ID: 34954112
Ours is 68 and everything's fine.  Wouldn't mind being 65, but trying to reduce electrical usage.
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Expert Comment

by:Amit
ID: 34954197
General recommendations suggest that you should not go below 10°C (50°F) or above 28°C (82°F). Although this seems a wide range these are the extremes and it is far more common to keep the ambient temperature around 20-21°C (68-71°F). For a variety of reasons this can sometimes be a tall order.

Temperature inside a rack is not to exceed 23°C or 73° F.

Another danger is humidity

Low relative humidity (as of 35% rH) has the danger of causing electrostatic discharge (ESD). ESD is caused by static charges resulting from people movement, charges on furniture etc... These charges are mostly not noticeable but when discharged to or in proximity of IT equipment, they can cause severe damage to the equipment.

Another danger of low humidity is the break down of some plastics in your equipment resulting in premature aging of it.

To overcome the danger of low humidity, moisture is often added to temperature controlling systems to avoid too dry conditions in server rooms.

High humidity or rapid temperature drops result in condensation that can occur on any surface. Water can condensate on the inside of IT equipment and cause rust or dust & dirt being deposited. This pose a great risk to the components and as a result to the availability of the equipment.

Relative Humidity (rH) is server rooms should be around 50% with a +/- 10% margin.
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