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TERMINAL SERVER START TO FINISH

Posted on 2011-02-23
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
Hi,  I wish to setup Terminal Server just as a test and I've read somewhere it should allow me temporary access for a period although normally regarding the CALS Im supposed to have the licenses!  All I wish to do is test on 1 client pc.

As i have not got a copy of Office 2007 I wish to temporarily use Office 2003 to install on my Terminal Server
My instructions say I need the following file but I can't find it on the internet ie: ORKSP2AT.exe?

I have found: ORKSP3AT.exe, but not sure if I can use this instead?  Im assuming I can as this may have been the most upto date after ORKSP2AT.exe!
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Question by:mikey250
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Tasmant earned 167 total points
ID: 34960262
You don't need these files.
Please follow this KB: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/828955/en-us
You have 120 days without the need of CALS for your tests.
But if it is only for 1 user, you can else use the embeded TSE for administrators.
On W2K it's an option, on W2K3, you have to autorize Remote Desktop.
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Author Comment

by:mikey250
ID: 34960580
Hi thanks for the info.

why dont i need ORKSP2AT.exe, as within are 2 files called: office11.adm & outlk11.adm, as Im following some instructions inconjunction with using GPMC.?

Also Ive been told that I need 2 Servers

1 x Server or DC win 2003 - installed also with Terminal Server Licensing" with the FSMO roles
1 x Server or Dc win 2003 - installed with Terminal Server on 2nd Server

To ensure no problems.  Im aware that there appears to be numerous ways of doing this and this is the confusion.

I will try your method as the instructions I have are old and the title starts:  Flash back to 1998: Microsoft release Windows NT 4.0 Terminal Server Edition, code named "Hydra".  Microsoft licensed technology from Citrix Systems creating its first thin-client.
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by:amichaell
amichaell earned 333 total points
ID: 34961791
In a production environment you'll want more than one Terminal Server.  The standard formula is to provide enough Terminal Servers to serve your user base + one server (N+1 model).  

I would also not run Terminal Server on a Domain Controller as you are then allowing users to log directly on to your Domain Controllers.
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Author Comment

by:mikey250
ID: 34962138
Hi amichaell,

ive been reading that for every RDP connection it is one NIC card although not sure what this exactly means, although I think it means for every separate subnet or more than likely for every separate Domain then a Separate Terminal Server is needed to allow users to logon to the Terminal Server within their own domains.  So im assuming this is what you mean 'production environment', something like this?

- Im running just as a Test environment

Ive been reading various stuff and all are contradictory, so what would you suggest, ie what should go where bearing in mind not doing production environment, just want to install, configure TS and instal Office 2003 for example on a server and then connect a host xp pc and logon to a TS so I know what to do?

Currently I have installed the following and done nothing else:

- 1 x Win 2003 Server, Master dc, dns, dhcp & sp2 & Terminal Server
- 1 x Standalone Win 2003 Server & SP2 & Terminal Licensing & Office 2003 located on this server

I think now from your point mentioned Im going to have to remove the Master dc and start from scratch?

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Author Comment

by:mikey250
ID: 34962176
so im going to need then 3 servers:

1 x Master dc, dns, dhcp & SP2
1 x 2nd dc, installed with Terminal Licensing
1 x none DC ie Member Server, with Terminal Server installed & Office 2003 for the potential users

Just a trial so I know what to do!!
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LVL 14

Assisted Solution

by:amichaell
amichaell earned 333 total points
ID: 34962278
What I meant by Production is that if users will be logging on to the servers to complete work.  This is as opposed to a Test environment in which you are just trying to learn the product.  If you are only working as a Test then one server is fine unless you want to try out load balancing/failover features.

I wouldn't put Terminal Server on a DC.  It isn't good security practice and you might be voiding support.
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Author Comment

by:mikey250
ID: 34962378
I thought the only reason to logon to a Terminal Server was so that a user can do work!!!  As the client pc may not have enough memory or no funds left in a companies bank etc..!

There are 2 parts to a TS ie Terminal Server & Terminal Licensing which can be selected separately or together!  Some other experts have said yes separate them as Ive mentioned on my other threads and some say no!:((?

so as you say No Terminal Server on a DC as below:  im going to need then 3 servers - just for this example

option 1:

1 x Master dc, dns, dhcp & SP2
1 x 2nd dc, installed with Terminal Licensing
1 x none DC ie Member Server, with Terminal Server installed & Office 2003 for the potential users

option 2:

Ok I wouldn't mind trying load balancing/failovers - so what do I need if I have it?

I have 5 pcs and they can be anything, so what exactly would you suggest, bearing in mind there are 2 parts to TS!!
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Author Comment

by:mikey250
ID: 34962434
All I wish to do is install Terminal Server & Terminal Licensing and once done connect a couple of host pcs and logon and allow them to open up Office 2003 and use and save something.
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Author Comment

by:mikey250
ID: 34962648
Hi amichaell,  im sure Ive seen users logon to a Domain when doing their work via TS, unless thats why there are 2 Parts to the TS as i mentioned earlier.
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Expert Comment

by:amichaell
ID: 34962711
Yes, they log on to a domain (the Terminal Server is a member of the domain), though the Terminal Server services/role should NOT be on a Domain Controller.
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Author Comment

by:mikey250
ID: 34962822
Ive just looked in components on win 2003 and the exact titles are:

Terminal Server - Configures this computer to allow multiple users to run one or more applications remotely.

- So this tells me that the Office 2003 should be installed on the Terminal Server.
 
Terminal Server Licensing - Configures this computer as a Terminal Server License server that provides client license

As thats why Ive been told to put the Terminal License on the Master DC & the Terminal Server as a Member Server!

The terminology 'Terminal Server Services' that you describe is confusing me!!
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Author Comment

by:mikey250
ID: 34962890
so i had it correct in the first place as below, EXCEPT that I should install Office 2003 on the Terminal Server DC

Currently I have installed the following and done nothing else:

- 1 x Win 2003 Server, Master dc, dns, dhcp & sp2 & Terminal Server
- 1 x Standalone Win 2003 Server & SP2 & Terminal Licensing & Office 2003 located on this server - Do I make this Server a member server?
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Author Comment

by:mikey250
ID: 34962973
if the Terminal Server License is NOT a DC, how does it communicate with the Terminal Server that is a DC?
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Author Comment

by:mikey250
ID: 34962994
When installing Terminal Server License on a CURRENTLY STANDALONE server the only prompt on offer is "make this license server available to: Your domain or workgroup".  So do I make this server FIRST OF ALL a Member Server or leave as a Standalone?
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Author Comment

by:mikey250
ID: 34963031
If i select "Your Domain or workgroup" as it is the only option it also states "Install license server database at this location", which by default shows c:\Windows\System32\LServer, or do I browse to the Master DC and Logon as it DOES prompt for me to LOGON in order to allow the License Server to communicate with the Terminal Server in the DC?
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