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DMZ Security Risk Questions

Posted on 2011-02-23
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Last Modified: 2013-12-02
I'm trying to determine if there are any weaknesses relating to an FTP server in our DMZ. Where would I start looking? I know this is a vague question, but I'm concerned about files containing sensitive data being stored on the server. Where would I start? Again, I know this is vague, but humor me. Thanks guys.
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Question by:isaacr25
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6 Comments
 
LVL 21

Expert Comment

by:Rick_O_Shay
ID: 34969373
I don't think you should put sensitive information on a server facing the outside where anyone can reach it.
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Author Comment

by:isaacr25
ID: 34969866
Even in the DMZ? Can you give me some reasons why? I'm not saying I support where it is... I just want some further info on the topic.
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LVL 16

Accepted Solution

by:
AlexPace earned 1336 total points
ID: 34969874
FTP sends userids and passwords in plain text.  Your users will be tempted to use the same password for everything so this is dangerous if they also have a domain account.  Its better to use one of the encrypted versions like FTPS (ftp over ssl) or SFTP (based on ssh.)
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Author Comment

by:isaacr25
ID: 34970838
Ok. So what about files that sit on the server (not necessarily being FTP's or SFTP'd)? How can those be at risk?
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LVL 21

Assisted Solution

by:Rick_O_Shay
Rick_O_Shay earned 664 total points
ID: 34971769
By definition things in the DMZ are outward facing and can be seen by anyone outside.
That makes it susceptible to attempts to hack it.
Sensitive stuff should be on the inside and only accessible to legitimate users via secure connection like SSL or IPSEC.
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LVL 16

Assisted Solution

by:AlexPace
AlexPace earned 1336 total points
ID: 34971886
For the same reason you need to be careful to keep the OS patched on all your machines in the DMZ.  You can't just wait and do it every 6 months or whenever you get around to it.
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