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Access 2003 database in a network

Posted on 2011-02-23
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I've made an Access 2003 database and have saved it in a shared folder on a network.

The database works as it's supposed to, but I'm not able to open it from 2 PCs on the network.
I'm able to open it from different machines, but only one at a time.
If this database is opened from B PC, I can't open it from C or D Pcs at the same time.
I have to wait until B closes the file to be able to open it from C or D PCs.

All the machines are windows xp home with Office 2003.
what are the possible reasons.


thanks for any kind of help.


I
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Question by:MnInShdw
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by:geowrian
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The database may be opened in exclusive mode. Check the settings here:

Access 2003
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/access-help/set-options-for-a-shared-access-database-mdb-HP005188297.aspx

Access 2007
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/access-help/ways-to-share-an-access-database-HA010279159.aspx
Note the "Share a database by using a network folder" section, specifically how to check if the PC is set to open in shared access mode vs exclusive mode.
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by:DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Access MVP)
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First, you are going need to split your database into a Front End (everything but tables) and Backend (only tables).  

How to manually split a Access database in Microsoft Access
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/304932

Splitting Microsoft Access Databases to Improve Performance and Simplify Maintainability
http://www.fmsinc.com/MicrosoftAccess/DatabaseSplitter/Index.html

Once that is done ... you need to give *each* user a *separate* copy of the 'master' FE ... which is linked to the BE on the server.

Start with these two suggestions.

mx
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by:DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Access MVP)
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There are *many* considerations for a multi user db.   I suggest you become familiar with the content in the following articles - before you get to deep into this - all of which are related to multi-user databases in Access:

100 Tips for Faster Microsoft Access Databases:
http://www.fmsinc.com/MicrosoftAccess/Performance.html

Ken Getz tips from Access 2002 Developer's Handbook:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa188211%28office.10%29.aspx  

Improve performance of an Access database
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/access-help/improve-performance-of-an-access-database-HP005187453.aspx

Microsoft Access Performance FAQ:
http://www.granite.ab.ca/access/performancefaq.htm

mx
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by:MnInShdw
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thanks for all the replies.

geowrian
The database is opened in shared mode (I checked the settings)

DatabaseMX
I'm running 7-8 other access(2010) applications by sharing them in a network shared folder and haven't had any problem so far.  Though it's not the best or most secure way, but for now, I prefer to stick with this method and not to split the database. The problem is why this access 2003 won't open from two PCs at the same time.

And I'm reading the links you posted at now to see if I can find any possible solution.

Meanwhile, any other advice is much appreciated.




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by:DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Access MVP)
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"The problem is why this access 2003 won't open from two PCs at the same time.
Understood.  But you have to start with the basics.  This question comes up several times in a month.
Until you split the db ... all bets are off.  This is a time tested proven approach recommended by all professional Access developers.

So ... unless your db is actually being opened Exclusively as geowrian suggested ... the it's back to the basics.

mx
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE ) earned 100 total points
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Agree with mx: Until you split the db all bets are off. The fact that you have others that work fine in this configuration is simple luck.

Check the Permissions on that shared folder. Make sure that the relevant Groups have Full permissions on that folder.
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by:OverBull
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Review that the permissions in to the folder for each user are write&read&change
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OverBull:

I posted the same suggestion 20 minutes prior to your suggestion.
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by:OverBull
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I don't see your answer till I posted! Sorry.
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by:Boyd (HiTechCoach) Trimmell, Microsoft Access MVP
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MnInShdw,

I have found that Access 2003/2007/2010 (full or runtime versions) do not like multiple users to opening the same mdb or mde at the same time. I have not attempted or want a solution to this since I see it as a bonus not an issue.

<<Until you split the db ... all bets are off>>  I totally agree. I will only support  Access databases that are  split into application and data






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by:MnInShdw
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The problem was the number of connections of windows xp home.

thank you.
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by:DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Access MVP)
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!
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