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Permission Question

Posted on 2011-02-23
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
How can you disutinguish between NTFS permissions and share permissions.

If you can get to a shared folder but not open it does that mean you have shared permission to see it but not NTFS permissions to examine what is inside?
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Question by:AJJ36
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by:smangogna
ID: 34967837
Of Course,

Starting with Windows Server 2003 Microsoft removed the everyone permission on the File System, so if you want to se a shared directory you must have both permission, in the Share and in the File System.

Sergio
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by:AJJ36
ID: 34969680
Thanks...I am studying for a test and need to know the differences between the two types of permissions.  Is it fair to say that the share opens the file up and the NTFS is what determines who can do what to that file.  Just trying to think of an easy way to think of it.  

Would that analogy be correct?
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Accepted Solution

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Jackie Man earned 500 total points
ID: 35015915
NTFS permssions are valid for both local access and remote access from the network.

Share permissions will also be applicable if the shares are accessed via remote access from the network.

It will be easier for you to understand the differences between NTFS permssions and Share permissions by drawing the analogy below.

You are the librarian of a national library which has huge collections of books, maps, works of arts... etc.

For every item inside the collections, there are rules which states who can acquire (create), dispose (delete), annoate (write / modify), read (read), and where the item is placed (folder) for every users of the library. Normally, the chief librarian or the library council (the administrator) has all the rights (full control). But, such rules will apply no matter the users use the items inside the library (local access) or outside the library (network access). It is basically the NTFS permissions.

For every item which can be borrowed, there are rules for borrowing also and for some items, there are rules that only the users with library card (token for access) can borrow the item out of the library. It is basically the Share permissions.

Finally, the article below gives a good explanation of the difference between NTFS permssions and Share permissions.

http://www.mcmcse.com/microsoft/guides/ntfs_and_share_permissions.shtml
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Expert Comment

by:Jackie Man
ID: 35023613
I think that the asker has requested to re-open this question instead of the one as mentioned in the link below.

http://www.experts-exchange.com/Community_Support/General/Q_26858653.html
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