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1Gb fiber cable

Posted on 2011-02-24
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Last Modified: 2012-06-21
Hi Experts,

I have 2 x 3com switches (they are gigabit switches, let's call switch A and B) and one fiber cable connected each switch. My questions is what is the realistic traffic that my fiber cable can handle from switch A to switch B?

Thanks.
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Question by:SJCA
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by:rfc1180
ID: 34975408
>My questions is what is the realistic traffic that my fiber cable can handle from switch A to switch B?

modern-day optical fibers can carry information at around 14 Terabits per second over 160 kilometers of fiber.

With that being said your fiber should handle 1Gbps with no issues; however, you will need to look the specs of the switch for the backplane and research how much data it can handle.  Some can range between 5-32Gbps for a fixed port switch depending on the vendor. All in all, you should be able to carry 1Gbps between switches with no issues.

Billy
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by:SJCA
ID: 34975469
The fiber cable that I have right now is 1Gbps, I know that traffic between 2 switches will not reach up to 1Gbps, can you tell me what traffic will I get in this case?

My fiber cable is TrippLite Duplex Multimode 62.5/125, LC/ST.
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rfc1180 earned 84 total points
ID: 34975598
>The fiber cable that I have right now is 1Gbps
The modules you have are more than likely rated at 1Gbps; Switch to switch for distanced under 2kmusing multimode fiber optic cable will deliver data rates up to 200 Mbps. Its operating wavelengths are 850 nm and 1300 nm.

>can you tell me what traffic will I get in this case?

In addition, multimode fiber optic cable can be used in intrabuilding distribution. For distances of 100 m or less the bandwidth is virtually unlimited.

Billy
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by:Rhyseh
Rhyseh earned 83 total points
ID: 34976056
The limitation here is likely the interfaces on your switch rather than the cable.
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by:BasementCat
BasementCat earned 83 total points
ID: 34976597
Without the models of your switches I can't say 100% but assuming that your fiber modules are in SFP ports, which is more than likely, they will be 1Gbps ports.
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by:lrmoore
lrmoore earned 83 total points
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> I know that traffic between 2 switches will not reach up to 1Gbps
Why  not? How are you measuring the throughput between the two switches?
If the switch fiber module is 1G on both ends, the fiber in between is not going be any kind of bottleneck as long as it tests clean. You could have dirty ends, cheap cables, incorrect optic modules on the switches, any number of reasons why you can't get the throughput that you think you ought to.
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by:giltjr
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rfc1180 answered:

The cable can handle 14 Tbps.  

Your switches are limited to 1 Gbps.  

So the limiting factor is not the cable, but your switches.  So the best you can get is 1 Gbps.
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by:eeRoot
ID: 35003741
Under real world conditions, 1 Gbps fiber throughput can be as slow as 750 - 850 Mbps.  But speeds that low are usually due to damaged fiber or a messed up network config.  Setting aside some bandwidth for overhead, you can expect upwards of 950 Mbps if everything is installed and configured correctly.
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by:SJCA
ID: 35142860
Thanks guys for the outputs.


How about 1Gbps cat 5e ethernet cable? will it be the same speed in real world conditions?
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by:BasementCat
ID: 35143026
it should be - 1Gbps is 1Gbps regardless of the physical layer.  I've gotten more or less the full throughput out of gigabit copper in "real world" conditions (read: transferring files from one computer to another across a dumb gigabit switch), I usually figure that when dealing with TCP you'll get a little over 80% of the theoretical maximum throughput of the connection, and that has held true for me as a good estimate.
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by:giltjr
giltjr earned 167 total points
ID: 35143208
A good quality cable (be it copper or fiber) properly run and cared for will be able to provide the through put it is rated for.

Properly run means no tight bends for either cable type.  For  unshielded copper not near anything that could cause electrical interference.  For shielded copper properly grounded.

Again, this assumes a good quality cable, run properly connected to proper equipment.  A Cat5e or Cat6 cable connected to devices rated at 100 Mbps will only get 100 Mbps at the max.  Connected to 1 Gbps devices will allow up to 1 Gbps.  Now, if your computer and your switch port is 1 Gbps but you are connected to a device that is only rated at 100 Mbps, you are going to only get 100 Mbps max.

What is your reasoning behind these questions?  Are you having problems and you suspect it is the cable?
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