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Why did Microsoft default users and computers in AD to containers?

Posted on 2011-02-24
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Had an interesting question asked of me by another person today... and either Google didn't have a great answer or my Google fu is down.

Anyways, the question is why did Microsoft choose Containers instead of OUs for the default location of computers and users in AD.
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Question by:Sommerblink
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Glen Knight earned 50 total points
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That's a good question, and in fact if you look at Small Business Server you will find that if you use the wizards that users, computers and groups are put in to Organisational Units instead of containers.

My take on this, is that a "vanilla" install of Active Directory in a non-SBS environment is there to be designed.  They setup the basics that let you get started.

You then setup your organisational structure and place users, computers, contacts, groups in to OU's specific to your organisation and if required setup delegation (can only be done on OU's)

It's all part of the "management" of Active Directory.  You are supposed to configure it, but if you chose not to, it will still work ;)
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by:KCTS
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Why is always a difficult if not impossible question to answer
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by:Sommerblink
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The only thing that I can think of is back in the NT days, when companies were migrating from NT to Active Directory and this was in place as some sort of backwards compatibility reason.. but NT was way before my time...

And demazter, I have long held the view that there are MANY things in the vanilla server load that need to be tweaked, such as things like turning on auditing for authentication failures... which SBS takes care of for you (by default)... therefore, to install the straight OS, you need to know what you're doing.
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by:Glen Knight
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That's the whole point.  SBS is designed to be self maintained.

Non-SBS installs are supposed to be "tweaked" or customised to meet the needs of the organisation.  They leave a vanilla install so you HAVE to set it up if you want full functionality.
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by:Glen Knight
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Oh and of course if they configure containers for Room1 and Room2 for example, room 1 for my might be a kitchen, and for you a toilet.

So...this is more than likely why they don't make OU's ;)
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