Expiring Today—Celebrate National IT Professionals Day with 3 months of free Premium Membership. Use Code ITDAY17

x
?
Solved

securing wireless connection on windows xp via netgear

Posted on 2011-02-25
6
Medium Priority
?
509 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-11
Hi Folks,

So I'm at a friends house using her wireless. Unsecured wireless. I tell her I will secure it for her. I'm on my laptop, not hers. I use Windows 7, she uses Windows XP. Can I secure her wireless connection from my laptop? and if so, does that mean that anyone that hooks into an unsecured wireless connection can secure it, locking out the owner?

Or is all this moot because I should secure it via her Netgear router?

Thanks
0
Comment
Question by:dlewis61
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
6 Comments
 
LVL 2

Accepted Solution

by:
Jerod Sanderson earned 84 total points
ID: 34981926
If the Netgear router has the default settings out of the box yes some one can connect to her wireless access the settings page via ip address and change the settings to lock the owner out.  on the router its self there should be a reset button or insturctions on how to reset the router to factory defaults if that should happen.  You can secure her wireless connection from your laptop.  
0
 
LVL 8

Assisted Solution

by:WesWilson
WesWilson earned 168 total points
ID: 34981930
You need to secure it by logging into her router. It doesn't matter what computer you connect from. The router will have a setup wizard you can access from your web browser.

If you connect via a wireless connection, be aware that when you apply the security settings to the router (which may include a software restart on the router) you will no longer be able to connect from your laptop without supplying the credentials. (If you connect via a network cable, you won't have that issue.)
0
 
LVL 7

Assisted Solution

by:Mdragga
Mdragga earned 84 total points
ID: 34981950
If the base IP address is still 192.168.0.1 (or something similar) then anyone with the ability to do a Google search for the default Router User/Password information that can get a signal can get in there and adjust the settings. Thankfully wireless network ranges are small and unless she has some particulary mischievous neighbors this probably won't be an issue. This interface isn't as user friendly as the intial setup software that will help you with the router setup but its still very doable for an expirienced user. I'd recommend you secure her network and changer her User/Password as well to provide her with some protection
0
Industry Leaders: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 
LVL 9

Assisted Solution

by:sah18
sah18 earned 84 total points
ID: 34981978
It doesn't matter which system (yours, hers, or anyone else's) you use to secure the network, because securing the network means that you are in fact connecting to her router (the netgear), and modifying the settings that are stored on her router.  This does require that you have access to the router, and as bbt suggests above, chances are high that this unsecured router still has its default login and password (since no one bothered to secure it, most likely no one bothered to change the username/password either).  So, once you're logged into the router, not only secure the network, but I'd highly recommend you also change the router password as well (and give that information to her -- or tape it to the bottom of the router itself).
0
 
LVL 8

Assisted Solution

by:WesWilson
WesWilson earned 168 total points
ID: 34982000
To connect to the router's Setup screen, go to your cmd prompt, do ipconfig, and check your default gateway (probably 192.168.1.254, 192.168.1.1, or 192.168.0.1). Put that address in your web browser.

When prompted for a password, login with username "admin" and password "password"

Be sure to change the password before you are done (and share the new password with the owner).

For more info, check out:

http://kb.netgear.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/112/~/securing-your-wireless-network%3A-wpa%2Fwpa2-%28recommended%29
0
 
LVL 1

Assisted Solution

by:Robert_ACi
Robert_ACi earned 80 total points
ID: 34982070
Don't do it over wireless, hardwire in and then set up the router. I always do a 30/30/30 reset on the router before I configure it. Hold the reset button in for 30 seconds, while keeping the reset button down, unplug the power, continue to hold for 30 more seconds and then plug the power back in and hold for the remaining 30 seconds. I like to wait until all of the lights train up and then I pull the plug and continue on to configuring. Point your browser to 192.168.0.1 and proceed to configure. The most important setting is the Wireless Security. Set it to WPA2 Personal as this is our best defense at the moment. After that, click the status page and ensure that you're getting an external IP. If you are, then you're all set.
0

Featured Post

On Demand Webinar - Networking for the Cloud Era

This webinar discusses:
-Common barriers companies experience when moving to the cloud
-How SD-WAN changes the way we look at networks
-Best practices customers should employ moving forward with cloud migration
-What happens behind the scenes of SteelConnect’s one-click button

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

How to set-up an On Demand, IPSec, Site to SIte, VPN from a Draytek Vigor Router to a Cyberoam UTM Appliance. A concise guide to the settings required on both devices
Resolve DNS query failed errors for Exchange
Michael from AdRem Software explains how to view the most utilized and worst performing nodes in your network, by accessing the Top Charts view in NetCrunch network monitor (https://www.adremsoft.com/). Top Charts is a view in which you can set seve…
We’ve all felt that sense of false security before—locking down external access to a database or component and feeling like we’ve done all we need to do to secure company data. But that feeling is fleeting. Attacks these days can happen in many w…

730 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question