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C++ Pointers

Hello,
Trying to understand the pointer concepts. Just tried the attached two programs.
I dont understand why the TestB.cpp doesn't work, it is crashing (Says process returned <0xC0000005>).
But TestA.cpp works fine as expected.  
Can somebody explain me why is this happening?

FYI I am using code::blocks in windows 7.

TestA.cpp
TestB.cpp
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v_eman
Asked:
v_eman
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2 Solutions
 
jkrCommented:
>>Can somebody explain me why is this happening?

The line

*j = 123;

(with 'j' being an 'int*') assings an 4-byte integer to a memory address on the stack that holds a 'char'. This address was set with the line

j = (int *)&c;

So, since the integer value is way too big for the 'char' memory location, you get an access violation.
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Infinity08Commented:
In the one that crashes for you :

>>     j = (int *)&c;

This in itself can cause problems due to memory alignment and when accessing the memory through this pointer, there is the potential to access unallocated memory (or even out-of-bounds or invalid memory).

This is one such access :

>>     cout<<*j<<endl;

This is another, which is actually trying to write data :

>>     *j = 123;

The latter is probably the cause of the crash, because it likely overwrites memory that it's not supposed to (for example, it might overwrite part of the c1 variable).


The one that doesn't crash for you has the same issues (apart from trying to write using the j pointer). The fact that it doesn't crash, doesn't make it any more valid.
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v_emanAuthor Commented:
Thank you for immediate responses Infinity08 and jkr, so, If I understood correctly both your comments, then the following code works fine without any potential problems. Am I right?
  int main()
{
    int i = 123;
    char *c1=0;
    int *j =0;
    j = &i;
    c1 = (char *)&i;
    //print the values
    cout<<*c1<<endl;
    cout<<*j<<endl;
    *c1 = 'b'; //or *j = 98;
    cout<<*c1<<endl;
    cout<<*j<<endl;
    return 0;
}
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jkrCommented:
Indeed, it does - yet you will get the ASCII representation of '123' as the first line of output. On the other hand, the code will not crash ;o)

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jkrCommented:
>>In the one that crashes for you :
>>>>     j = (int *)&c;

Well, it is the dark prelude, yet the actual crash is the assignment

*j = 123;

;o)
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Infinity08Commented:
>> Well, it is the dark prelude, yet the actual crash is the assignment

with "the one" in "In the one that crashes for you", I meant the TestB.cpp file, not the line that followed immediately after in my post. Could have made that a bit more clear.

Although, technically, that line could also cause a crash (if there are issues with memory alignment).
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