how can i look up the ip of a subdomain

How can i look up the IP of a subname?

I have created a subdomain but not traffiic seems to go to it?  I would like to check its IP.  How do i do that?
soozhAsked:
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ChiefITConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Assuming your subdomain has outside servers as forwarders, you should be able to ping it by FQDN.

Example: Ping google.com

Other than that, you might try this web site to see if the FQDN resolves.  

http://www.selfseo.com/find_ip_address_of_a_website.php

If you were on that subdomain, you could go to a website called whatismyip.com to determine the outside IP address of your router.
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CompProbSolvCommented:
What is the device whose IP address you want to know?  What OS is it running?
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soozhAuthor Commented:
does it matter was machine/OS it is?

I thought that if I can look up the IP of a domain name using who is, there must be some way to look up the subdomain...
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Rick_at_ptscintiCommented:
I think I understand what you are asking...I am not sure of a look-up tool to do that.

I think the issue you are going to run into is that sometimes sub-domains are defined at the DNS level but other times at the application layer (ie inside the webserver software like IIS).  If it's done inside the webserver itself then the IP address is always the same.

What are you trying to find?
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soozhAuthor Commented:
When i look up the main domain i get an ip address returned, but it does not find the sub domian.

Does this mean the subdomain does not exist?  Maybe I have missunderstod how sub domains work.?

Who is responsible for resolving the ip address of the subdomain?
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Neil RussellTechnical Development LeadCommented:
DNS is responsible for all IP address's

Creating a subdomain on your external web hosting? Is this wht you mean?
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Rick_at_ptscintiCommented:
The sub-domains are most likely using the same IP address

1.  User enters www.mysite.com/test
2.  DNS resolves www.mysite.com to 4.4.4.4  (it doesn't care about the full path, only the domain)
3.  Browser reaches out to 4.4.4.4 and passes the full path it's trying to go to.
4.  Webserver itself looks at the full request and routes it to the appropriate sub-domain (in this case /test)

You can get a provider like network solutions to route your sub-domains to different IP addresses but that is a little easier to figure out because an NSLOOKUP will show you that it is resolving to a different IP.

Rick
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Neil RussellTechnical Development LeadCommented:
"routes it to the appropriate sub-domain (in this case /test)"
/test is not a subdomain, it is within the same domain space.

A subdomain of www.company.com would be something like www.subdomain.company.com


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giltjrConnect With a Mentor Commented:
You can look up the IP address of a subdomain the exact same way you look up the IP address of a domain, or even a host.

If you look up the subdomain and it returns no address found, then somebody did not setup a DNS entry for it.

If it is truly a subdomain then somebody should have setup not only a DNS entry for it, but a full dns zone entry, just as if it were a base domain.
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BasementCatCommented:
You can look up a subdomain exactly like you would look up any other domain.  If the subdomain is "www" then it is entirely likely that the ip that the subdomain resolves to will be the same as the domain itself.  Otherwise, it may be different.  Open up a command prompt (windows) or a terminal (linux, osx) and try:
nslookup subdomain.domain.com

Open in new window

replacing "subdomain.domain.com" with the subdomain that you want to look up.  That will give you the IP that it is currently pointed to.
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