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Partitioning Riad 5 array

Posted on 2011-02-28
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I have a server that is configured in a Raid 5 I need to partition it with a C: and H: partition. When I attempt to do this It wants to leave 745 GB unallocated and wont let me do anything with it. It has 6 hdds in it and being able to use all the space available is very important. This is an IBM X3650 server incase you are wondering. When installing the OS I can only setup one partition which is C:

Thanks for your help ahead of time.
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Question by:terryw-sec
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by:PowerEdgeTech
ID: 34998555
What size are your disks?  Remember, Windows cannot boot to a >2TB partition (unless installed on EFI-enabled system), and Windows cannot even see a >2TB partition unless it is GPT.
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by:terryw-sec
ID: 34998606
The drives are 600GB
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by:terryw-sec
ID: 34998614
I created the C: drive at 60GB and wanted to use the rest as the H: partition. Thanks
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by:PowerEdgeTech
ID: 34998700
Ok, so you have roughly 2.8TB of total available storage space.  If your board supports EFI and your OS is 2008x64 or higher, you can enable EFI (instead of BIOS) and install on it, using the full space.  If you are using 2003 or less or 2008 32-bit, you cannot use EFI.  In this case (or if you choose not to use EFI), you must either separate your disks and create separate arrays (I.e. 2x600-RAID1(600B) = OS, 4x600-RAID5(1.8TB) = DATA), or you must create multiple arrays across the same set of disks.  In don't know if you controller supports that, but basically you would create a RAID 5 across all six disks using 60GB, then create a second RAID 5 across those 6 disks, using the rest of the space.  This second RAID 5 would show in Windows Disk Management as a second "disk", which you would have to convert to GPT in order to access the 2.7TB of storage.
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by:PowerEdgeTech
ID: 34998719
It would appear as though your system supports EFI, so the first option is ok, but without knowing which RAID card you have, I can't tell you if the second option will work for you.
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by:terryw-sec
ID: 34998764
I have a IBM ServeRAID 8k/8k-l Controller

Thanks
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by:terryw-sec
ID: 34998773
It is also server 2003 32bit operating system.
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by:PowerEdgeTech
ID: 34998937
So, with 2003, these are your only options:

1. Create multiple RAID arrays across the disks, then convert the larger "disk" to GPT.
2. Break up the disks into smaller array groups (two in RAID 1 and four in RAID 5).
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by:terryw-sec
ID: 34998976
So my controller will let me create multiple arrays across the disks? Sorry but what is GPT?
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by:andyalder
ID: 34999133
PET's option 1 is preferable, easier to maintain if seperate logical disks as far as the OS sees them.
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PowerEdgeTech earned 500 total points
ID: 34999316
It is how an OS sees the disk ... traditionally (and default) is MBR, which has a limit of 2TB.  GPT, among other things, allows for >2TB disks.

A quick Google search seems to indicate it does, but not being familiar with them, I'm not sure how to advise you to configure it that way.  When you go into your configuration utility to configure RAID, you should have an option to specify the size of the RAID.  Specify 60GB, and it should leave the rest available to configure into a larger RAID 5 later.
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Author Closing Comment

by:terryw-sec
ID: 35001784
Thanks to all for your help.
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