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How do I make sure event are written immediately and not buffered in Centos 5.x

Posted on 2011-02-28
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I believe that Centos buffers logs for many services (it might be the service itself, I don't know) and I want to make sure that when Apache sees an error it is written right away, the same with sshd,e tc.

Is there a way to change the buffering settings?
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Question by:rduval
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by:mccracky
ID: 35008144
Assuming you have the ext3 file system, you are going to be looking at the "commit" interval.  By default, it is set to sync data to the disk every five (5) seconds.  

You can change that in /etc/fstab for partitions that aren't root, but need to add the option to the kernel line (in GRUB) for the root partition.  

You probably also should read this:
http://www.westnet.com/~gsmith/content/linux-pdflush.htm
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by:rduval
ID: 35010832
What would that line be in GRUB (in the .conf I presume?)
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mccracky earned 2000 total points
ID: 35011144
to change it off the default 5 seconds, it should just be appending "rootflags=commit=3" or the like to the end of the kernel line.  See, for example: http://blog.loxal.net/2008/01/tuning-ext3-for-performance-without.html
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