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Table explanation (Lowfatspread?) for cutoff days

Posted on 2011-03-01
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
In the related question, Lowfatspread mentions having 2 tables. My table..if you look at it...only has cutoff hours with the year being 1900. Not sure what he means but can he or someone explain what his solution means?

thanks
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Question by:Camillia
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6 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:Jeffrey Coachman
ID: 35014386

<In the related question, Lowfatspread mentions having 2 tables. My table..if you look at it..>
"Look at it"?
Great, now if we only had the link that leads us to this mysterious "related question", we might be able to help, ...agreed?

;-)

JeffCoachman
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LVL 35

Expert Comment

by:James0628
ID: 35014865
 Jeff,

 There is a "Related Solutions" link right above your post.  :-)

 James
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Accepted Solution

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James0628 earned 2000 total points
ID: 35014925
Hopefully Lowfatspread will show up, but, FWIW, I think he had two main points:

 1) If you really only need to compare the hours, do you need the date at all?  Your cutoff table could just have the hours in it, in char form (eg. '16:00:00'), and you could use CONVERT to convert the datetime to hh:mm:ss, and compare just the times.

 2) Are the cutoff times different on different days of the week, or on holidays?  If so, then you might have one table with the cutoff times for each day of the week, and a second table with the cutoff times for each holiday.  If a date was found in the holiday table, you'd use those cutoff times.  Otherwise, you'd use the cutoff times from the first table, based on the day of the week.

 If the cutoff times are always the same for every day, then I don't think #2 applies.

 James
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LVL 74

Expert Comment

by:Jeffrey Coachman
ID: 35017126
<There is a "Related Solutions" link right above your post.  :-)>
WTFHAX!

;-)

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Author Comment

by:Camillia
ID: 35020501
boag2000 ...hehe :)
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LVL 35

Expert Comment

by:James0628
ID: 35025033
 Jeff,

 :-)


 Farzadw,

 I hope that makes sense.  At least, that's the way that I interpret what Lowfatspread posted.  And he raised a couple of good points.

 James
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