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Active directory 2003 disk setup

Posted on 2011-03-01
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Last Modified: 2012-06-21
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For 100 users on 2003 domain what disk configuration would be ideal.

C drive 30GB
D: SYSVOL
E: logs

or could i do with just C: for OS and D for all of AD folders.

Is it worth seperating the page file for an Active Directory server which i have seen done previously.
I normally just put it on C drive but want to make better use.

RAID 5 enviroment with 3 SAS 146gb disks

Thanks
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Question by:flowit
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by:Lee W, MVP
Lee W, MVP earned 100 total points
ID: 35009583
Why are you putting AD on a separate partition? There's little if any point to that, especially in a small environment.

And if you don't have multiple physical disks AND you aren't tight on space on your C drive, putting the pagefile on a separate partition doesn't do much (if anything) for you.
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by:jlanderson1
jlanderson1 earned 267 total points
ID: 35009648
3 Drives (RAID V) using 146GB = roughly 292 GB usable space.

I would create the C: partition at 40GB.
This gives you more than enough room, although not knowing how much physical RAM is in the server, the size of your PAGEFILE will vary.  There is not need to put this in a seperate partition.

I would create the second partition with the rest of the usable space.
There is no need to put the SYSVOL information on its on partition in such a small environment.
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by:snusgubben
snusgubben earned 133 total points
ID: 35009897
I agree with leew. Make one partition and that's it. Back in the days when the discs where spinning slowly and you had a database system installed, it was recomended to have the logs and db on seperate raids.

A domain with 100 users is nowhere near the need to split it up.

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jlanderson1 earned 267 total points
ID: 35009929
I agree that there is no Physical reason to seperate the sytem and data, but from a visual/logical standpoint, it makes sense to me.

Use C: just for the system drive (Windows, SYSVOL, print spooler, pagefile)
Use D: for everything else (UserShares, Fileshares, Program Files)

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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 35010115
Let me be clear. Anything backed up typically in a system state (such as active directory), in my opinion belongs on the C: drive unless there's a good reason not to put it there.

Any other data should be stored on a separate partition or drive array depending on usage needs.
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by:jlanderson1
ID: 35013560
Right...looks like we agree...Everything system related on C:...
Everything else on D:......
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by:snusgubben
ID: 35014976
The author says this is a DC, not a file server or similar. Hes got 3 disks so he can only create one array.

It's a waste and asking for later problems if he partition the disk. If he want to seperate data he should get more disks and make a separate disk array.
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