Solved

Ethernet Private Line

Posted on 2011-03-01
12
1,123 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-11
We recently had a 100Mbps Ethernet Private Line installed between our two offices. We are seeing speeds using iPerf of 100Mbps with UDP. However, We are only getting max speeds of 30Mbps with TCP. Does the windows packets need to be adjusted from the default size of 64Kbps, and if so, how is that done.
0
Comment
Question by:wadehood
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2
  • +2
12 Comments
 
LVL 17

Accepted Solution

by:
Kvistofta earned 500 total points
ID: 35014838
What do you mean with "default size of 64Kbps"? The size of a packet is defined in bytes, not bytes per second (bps). The normal maximum packet size for ethernet ie 1500 bytes and that can be raised if you know that all devices in transit can handle larger packets, which is not always the case.

What you suffer is probably not related to packet sizes but rather the tcp windows size in the end host. That value controls how much tcp data to send before getting an acknowledgements. If you have a fast network with relative high response time you have what is commonly named LFN or Long Fat network. What needs to be done then is to raise the tcp windows size in the computers in both ends in order to send larger chunks of data before requiring an acknowledge of that data chunk.

I have personal experience of a 500Mbps ethernet-type wan-connection where the backup system could only utilize 30Mbps out of the 500Mbps available. When changing a registry setting in the two backup-devices (running Windows 2003s) we instantly made it possible to pass 480Mbps of data thru that link.

More info about LFN:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bandwidth-delay_product

Best regards
Kvistofta
0
 
LVL 34

Expert Comment

by:Istvan Kalmar
ID: 35015064
Hi,

You need to test with MTU 1500, because it is the 'default size of ETH packet'
You never reach 100M with 64 bytes packets on this line:

http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc2544.html
0
 
LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:Kvistofta
ID: 35015850
ikalmar: MTU is an ethernet-setting. With UDP he gets 100Mbps, the issue is with TCP.

/Kvistofta
0
Free NetCrunch network monitor licenses!

Only on Experts-Exchange: Sign-up for a free-trial and we'll send you your permanent license!

Here is what you get: 30 Nodes | Unlimited Sensors | No Time Restrictions | Absolutely FREE!

Act now. This offer ends July 14, 2017.

 
LVL 34

Expert Comment

by:Istvan Kalmar
ID: 35015912
TCP transmission depends on MTU and delay... So we need more info about the problem

0
 
LVL 57

Expert Comment

by:giltjr
ID: 35017470
What OS(s) are you using?

Do they have current fixes on them?

Most current OS's do not have a fixed TCP Window size of 64KB any more, they now use sliding windows and thus they adjust on the fly based on various things they see during the transfer.

What is the latency? ping a host on the other side and see what the RTT is.
0
 

Author Comment

by:wadehood
ID: 35018141
Thanks for all your responses. I stand corrected...I should have said default size of 64KB. We will play with the TCP WIndows sizes. In addition, I understand that at the AT&T side they are moving our lines from an OC 3 to an OC 12. This may help as well. Will keep all posted.
0
 
LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:Kvistofta
ID: 35018298
wadehood: You are right, the 64KB is the tcp windows size I mention above, and that is the value you need to raise in order to utilize full bandwidth. Please keep us updated on the progress.

ikalmar: Yes but the MTU and delay affects the UDP-thruput aswell and since the author gets full thruput with UDP the issue is related to TCP itself, not any underlaying protocol. Please read the posted links about LFN:s ("elephants" :-) )

giltjr: You are right about the sliding window for TCP. What I write is the maximum value for the sliding window that needs to be raised.

Best regards
Kvistofta
0
 
LVL 32

Expert Comment

by:harbor235
ID: 35018395


Most modern IP stacks support auto scaling of the TCP window, unless you have hard coded a partiuclar size window this is negoitated to the max window availble. I agree with ikalmar, throughput is a function of several things, mtu, delay, window size, link reliability, congestion, PMTUD, etc .......

I doubt your problem is the window size alone, there are additional factors.

harbor235 ;}
0
 
LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:Kvistofta
ID: 35018433
Windows server 2003 has sliding window support, up to a maximum of 64KB. I got 6% thruput in a 500Mbps-connection before raising the tcp maximum window size.

Go figure.

/Kvistofta
0
 
LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:Kvistofta
ID: 35018555
And just to clarify: Of course the delay is an important factor. The Maximum window size is depending upon the Bandwith-delay-product which obviously is based on available bandwidth and delay (RTT).

/Kvistofta
0
 
LVL 57

Expert Comment

by:giltjr
ID: 35018715
If you can get near 100 Mbps with UDP then moving from OC3 to OC12 will not change a thing.

UDP just throws data over it shoulder and goes.  It has no pacing or ack's or guarteened delivery.  If it gets there it gets there, if it does not the application needs to recover.

TCP has pacing (window sizes) and ACKs to prevent flooding the nettwork with data and has recovery if a packet is dropped.

Kvistofta, I don't think you are using sliding window.  Based on what you are saying I think you are still using a fixed window size.

Sidling window sizes allows for windows larger than 65K.  The 65K is the limit for fixed window sizes.

Windows 2003 does have sliding window support, but it does NOT use it by default. So by default it will use a FIXED Window size and that size is based on a few other things.  If you want 2003 to use sliding windows you need to set the Tcp1323Opts registry value to 1.

When using sliding windows, there is another field that is used as a multiplier.  The multiplier is used in conjuction with the TcpWindowSize to calulate the true window size.
0
 
LVL 32

Expert Comment

by:harbor235
ID: 35018789

Sliding window and auto scaling are not the same, In addition, other things to consider are your udp/tcp send and receive buffers, they impact greatly perfromance.

Not to mention that MS (Vista for sure) IP stacks are known to have issues with TCp window scaling and network equipment

harbor235 ;}
0

Featured Post

Don't Miss ATEN at InfoComm 2017!

Visit booth #2167 to see the  new ATEN VM3200 32 x 32 Modular Matrix Switch. Other highlights include the VE8950 4K HDMI Over IP Extender, VS1912 12-Port DP Video Wall Media Player  and VK2100 ATEN Control System. Register now with Free Pass Code ATEN288!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Configuring network clients can be a chore, especially if there are a large number of them or a lot of itinerant users.  DHCP dynamically manages this process, much to the relief of users and administrators alike!
Sometimes clients can lose connectivity with the Lotus Notes Domino Server, but there's not always an obvious answer as to why it happens.   Read this article to follow one of the first experiences I had with Lotus Notes on a client's machine, my…
In this video, viewers will be given step by step instructions on adjusting mouse, pointer and cursor visibility in Microsoft Windows 10. The video seeks to educate those who are struggling with the new Windows 10 Graphical User Interface. Change Cu…
Michael from AdRem Software outlines event notifications and Automatic Corrective Actions in network monitoring. Automatic Corrective Actions are scripts, which can automatically run upon discovery of a certain undesirable condition in your network.…

691 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question