• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 874
  • Last Modified:

How do I connect two routers and have one wifi the other not.

I have two routers; One is a Linksys WRT54g I flashed with DDWRT and the other is a Netgear wireless N router.

My Comcast enters the house upstairs and goes into one router the netgear, I will only have wired users use this router so I have disabled the wireless. I have a 80’ cable plugged into this router that goes downstairs to the other router and plugs into it. I want to use the downstairs router for wireless only for laptops and iphone, so I will set the mac filter for specific IP’s, this should keep any other wireless users off that wireless network.
My question is how do I connect the upstairs router to the downstairs router so that I can keep wired users plugged in (running DHCP) and then have DHCP running downstairs on the wifi router, yet the downstairs router is plugged into a port on the upstairs router that is DHCP.

Can someone please help me out or make a suggestion to get this to work.
0
manelson05
Asked:
manelson05
  • 6
  • 5
1 Solution
 
dddoooeeeCommented:
The Netgear router is capable of being a "Hot Spot Only" unit and not acting as a router.  If your DDWRT router is not capable of doing the same I would simply swap the routers positions and set the Netgear to act as a hotspot.
0
 
manelson05Author Commented:
I understand that but how do you set Router 1 as DHCP coming from the gateway (comcast) whihc will automatically take an assigned ip  and then assigne dhcp addresses to the wired clients, keeping in mind that one port has a 80' cable that connects the router downstairs which broadcasts the wifi signal for wireless clients.
0
 
manelson05Author Commented:
What about bridging?

Router 1 has DHCP server on it enabled, three ports are for computers upstairs, port 4 is a 80' cable that goes downstairs to the DDWRT router. If I plug the dhcp cable into a router then that router should be set to DHCP address. Will it still be able to hand out a dhcp address to the wifi clients on its mac list and accept additional wired clients?
0
NEW Internet Security Report Now Available!

WatchGuard’s Threat Lab is a group of dedicated threat researchers committed to helping you stay ahead of the bad guys by providing in-depth analysis of the top security threats to your network.  Check out this quarters report on the threats that shook the industry in Q4 2017.

 
SnibborgOwnerCommented:
The Netgear router will supply IP addresses to any device it sees on the network, whether that device is wired or wireless.  If you are trying to supply wired clients from one DHCP server and wireless from a second DHCP server you will get serious problems.

I would suggest that you use DHCP throughout, limit the number of IP addresses to the maximum number of devices you are going to use and then use MAC address filtering to prevent unauthorised access.

You should note that if you are using MAC filtering instead of encryption, like WPA or WPA2, the solution is less secure as a packet sniffer can pick out the MAC addresses and these can then be spoofed by modifying the registry of a PC.

Snibborg
0
 
manelson05Author Commented:
Hows this look?

RTR 1
WAN: Comcast dhcp
LAN:
Router IP: 192.168.1.10
Router  dfg: 192.168.1.1
Router mask: 255.255.255.0
Static IP’s 192.168.1.11 – 13 PC’s
Router two: 192.168.1.14


RTR2

WAN:
192.168.1.14
192.168.1.1
255.255.255.0

LAN:
DHCP scope(8)
192.168.2.1 - 8


Static route: ip route 192.168.2.0 192.168.1.0
0
 
SnibborgOwnerCommented:
The one router will not see the other with that subnet, use 255.255.0.0.

Snibborg
0
 
manelson05Author Commented:
So use 255.255.0.0 on Router 2 or what about changing Router 2 to the following?
RTR2

WAN:
192.168.1.14
192.168.1.1
255.255.255.0

LAN:
DHCP scope(8)
192.168.1.100-105
0
 
SnibborgOwnerCommented:
You need that subnet mask on both routers, as data travels both ways.

Snibborg
0
 
manelson05Author Commented:
But 24 bit mask would not work on both?
0
 
SnibborgOwnerCommented:
If you use what you indicate:

WAN:
192.168.1.14
192.168.1.1
255.255.255.0

LAN:
DHCP scope(8)
192.168.1.100-105

Then 255.255.255.0 can be used on both the router and the wireless as they are both on the same subnet.  The problem was that you were using 192.168.1.xxx for one set of addresses and 192.168.2.xxx as the other.  Once you do that, a class C subnet (255.255.255.0) will not work.

Now you've got rid of the 2 subnet everything should be fine.

Snibborg
0
 
manelson05Author Commented:
Thanks Snibborg
0
 
SnibborgOwnerCommented:
All part of the service.  Thanks for the points.

Snibborg
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

Featured Post

Worried about phishing attacks?

90% of attacks start with a phish. It’s critical that IT admins and MSSPs have the right security in place to protect their end users from these phishing attacks. Check out our latest feature brief for tips and tricks to keep your employees off a hackers line!

  • 6
  • 5
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now