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How to create a password file in CentOS

Posted on 2011-03-02
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
Hello,
Can someone please tell me how I can create a password file in CentOS?

Heres a little history of the issue. My domain has a minimum password length of 14 characters with complexity. I am trying to create a cifs share in CentOS that will map a CentOS directory to a Windows share. For some reason, when I try to mount the windows share, it says that the Password is too long and does not allow me to create the mount because it does not authenticate the user. I have heard in other articles that there is a way to overcome this by creating a password file and referencing that file in the mount command on CentOS. Any suggestions? I would like to see the commands on how to create the password file and what should be included in the mount command to finally mount the windows share.

Thank you..
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Question by:serg2626
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by:edster9999
ID: 35021515
The password file is plain text.
Uggghhhhh.  Sorry I shuddered just thinking about that.

In the mount command you would put something like

credentials=/root/cifspasswd

The plain text file then conatins :
username=value
password=value

so you could creat the file by doing :
echo "username=serg2626" > /root/cifspasswd
echo "password=MySecRet#PassWord999" >> /root/cifspasswd

The bad news is that is pretty much as secure as it gets.  Your login password just sigging in a file.
You should of course set the rights on the file so only you (root) can read it
chmod 400  /root/cifspasswd

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Author Comment

by:serg2626
ID: 35021756
Can you give me the full mount command that I would enter. Assume that the target linux directory is called "backups" and the windows share is called "\\test\share".

Thank you again..
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edster9999 earned 2000 total points
ID: 35022106
From memory it is something like :

mount -t cifs //test/share -o credentials=/root/.cifspasswd /mnt/backup

I have not mounted one like that for a long time.  I do have some old lines in my fstab file you can see :

you can do it in /etc/fstab with something like :

//test/share    /mnt/backups       cifs    credentials=/root/.cifspasswd 0 0

You could get a bit more fancy by adding which user and group to pretend to be in the linux system and what rights to set on files or directories it finds :

//test/share    /mnt/backups       cifs    credentials=/root/.cifspasswd,uid=backupuser,gid=backupgroup,filemode=640,dirmode=750 0 0

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