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How do I identify conflicting/failing group policy settings?

Posted on 2011-03-02
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I have a Windows Server 2003 Box, set up as a terminal server. Through policy settings, Group A, B, and C are allowed to logon through terminal services. Intermittently (every 3 months or so), members of group A will report that they can log in, but the "all programs" menu on the start menu is missing, and the list of recently opened programs is also empty. Members of Group B and C are unable to log in at all, and are returned with an error message that they do not have access.

Checking the security settings at this time shows that Group A is the only group allowed to log on through terminal services. After a reboot of the server, the settings are restored, and all three groups are listed and working as normal. I have checked the event logs, and apart from some errors in applying some group policy power options, I have no leads. I suspect that it is a conflict between local policy and group policy, or perhaps an error with how the group policy is being applied and distributed, but I'm not sure where to go.
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Question by:LCA-TSoln
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jlar310 earned 500 total points
ID: 35019541
Are you using the Group Policy Management Console?

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=0a6d4c24-8cbd-4b35-9272-dd3cbfc81887&displaylang=en

It has a Group Policy Results Wizard that can show you what settings are being applied to a session and which GPO is the source of each setting.
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by:snusgubben
ID: 35019917
... and the winning GPO if there is a "conflict" :)

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