Solved

Windows 2008 AD DNS issues

Posted on 2011-03-02
6
342 Views
Last Modified: 2012-08-13
Aloha,
   I have a super strange issues with Windows 2008 AD.  Our DNS Server (AD enabled) is having a lot of issues with the reverse lookup zone.  I can do forward lookups (EX.  xyz.somewhare.com)
but I can not do reverse lookups (EX. xyz).  I am not sure how to fix this situation.  We do have a pure Windows 2008 AD.  The servers are no in Native Mode, they are in Mix Mode.  The servers were migrated from 2000AD to 2008AD.  

Any help would be great :)

Thanks,
supertechhawaii  
0
Comment
Question by:supertechhawaii
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 3
  • 2
6 Comments
 
LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:mlongoh
ID: 35021532
I'm not sure what you mean by reverse lookup.  My understanding of a reverse lookup is you provide an IP address and have the DNS server resolve the DNS host names (ie: 192.168.1.4 resolves to xyz.somewhere.com).

Is this what you are having trouble with?
0
 

Author Comment

by:supertechhawaii
ID: 35021550
Aloha mlongoh,
   That is the exact issue.  This is for all my reverse lookup zones.

Thanks,
supertechhawaii
0
 
LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:mlongoh
ID: 35021629
How many different subnets do you have and how many appear to be represented in DNS?  Are you manually populating any entries or relying solely on dynamic updates to populate DNS?
0
Salesforce Made Easy to Use

On-screen guidance at the moment of need enables you & your employees to focus on the core, you can now boost your adoption rates swiftly and simply with one easy tool.

 

Author Comment

by:supertechhawaii
ID: 35021644
I only have 1 subnet.  I am relying on dynamic updates as well as static entries for the DNS.
0
 

Author Comment

by:supertechhawaii
ID: 35021654
I have checked and the zone is an AD zone.
0
 
LVL 12

Accepted Solution

by:
Navdeep earned 500 total points
ID: 35022186
Hi,

Reverse lookup zones support the resolution of IP addresses to host names. Although they are optional in most networks, reverse lookup zones might be necessary for certain secure applications that require the validation of IP addresses.


Try recreate your reverse lookup zone

http://www.windowsreference.com/dns/how-to-create-dns-reverse-lookup-zone-in-windows-server-2003/

This article is for server 2003 but more or less it's applicable.
0

Featured Post

Independent Software Vendors: We Want Your Opinion

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Title # Comments Views Activity
ADMFILES.INI 7 52
CTIOS error on Windows 10 3 59
Recover from a ISCSI Share In Windows 2 66
Event 4515 - DNS Server Service - Another copy of zone in DomainDnsZones 3 44
This article runs through the process of deploying a single EXE application selectively to a group of user.
Did you know that more than 4 billion data records have been recorded as lost or stolen since 2013? It was a staggering number brought to our attention during last week’s ManageEngine webinar, where attendees received a comprehensive look at the ma…
To efficiently enable the rotation of USB drives for backups, storage pools need to be created. This way no matter which USB drive is installed, the backups will successfully write without any administrative intervention. Multiple USB devices need t…
This tutorial will walk an individual through the process of configuring their Windows Server 2012 domain controller to synchronize its time with a trusted, external resource. Use Google, Bing, or other preferred search engine to locate trusted NTP …

739 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question