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Difference bettwen Oracle and SQL Server

Posted on 2011-03-02
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Can some very briefly explain to me the difference Oracle Database vs Sql Server?  Is Oracle just designed better for managing larger volumes of data?  
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Question by:Hojoformo
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himanshut earned 500 total points
ID: 35023555
Got his from : http://www.greenspun.com/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg.tcl?msg_id=0090bA

1. Oracle runs on many platforms, SQL on Windows only 2. Oracle includes IFS (Internet File System), Java integration, SQL is more of a pure database 3. Oracle requires client install and setup (Not difficult, but very UNIX-like for Windows users) 4. SQL is #1 in Cost/Performance and overall Performance, although Oracle will refute that 5. Replication is much easier in SQL (I have been at clients where even the Oracle consultant couldn't get it working w/oracle) 6. Failover support in SQL is much, much easier 7. JDBC support is much better in Oracle, although Microsoft is working on it 8. ODBC support in both 9. SQL is ANSI-SQL '92 compliant, making it easier to convert to another ANSI compliant database, theoretically anyway (truth is every database has proprietary extensions). Oracle is generally more proprietary and their main goal is to keep their customers locked-in. 10. SQL natively supports ODBC, OLEDB, XML, XML Query, XML updates. Oracle natively supports proprietary connections, JDBC. Not sure about XML support though. 11. SQL Server is much easier to administrate, with GUI and command- line tools. Most of Oracle is command-line (Back in SQL 6.5 days I had a customer who was so proud that after a day's worth of work he had managed to script his database. I showed him how it was a 3 click operation in SQL ;-) 12. Oracle requires add-ons for transaction monitors, failover, etc. SQL has COM+, uses NT clustering and generally has everything built-in 13. SQL Analysis Services is included (A very powerful OLAP server). For Oracle it is a separate purchase.
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by:Chris Luttrell
ID: 35023647
I agree with a lot of the gerneral ideas in the previous post, but that really seems to be from a very MS SQL biased view.  And some of it seems old, talking about "Back in SQL 6.5 days", they have both come a long ways since the mid-90s.
Oracle is definately percieved by many (outside MS) to be the high end database for high volume and size, but MS is making very good headway to VLDB status.
Oracle administration is percieved to be harder to learn and do probably because it is usually deployed by big companies with expert SysAdmin types that know all the internals and such, which also help explain why administrators are more expensive and harder to find.  MS SQL on the other hand has been geared more for the average business to be able to get set up with simpler GUI interfaces and lots of adequite defaults.
Overall Oracle installations are going to be more expensive and ellaborate but MS claiming all the extras like Analysis Services and Reporting Services are included for free is a little misleading.  If you follow their own best practices and separate the funtions onto their own servers, you get to PAY for the licenses anyway, not really free.  Not saying they are not good tools, just not really "Free".
Being in the consulting world we typically see only the larger companies that can afford it using Oracle, no startup or small business trying to do things on the cheep are going to go down that route.
Personally I liked and miss working on Oracle databases, I did back in those early "SQL 6.5" days mentioned before, but I have to say MS has come a long way and we have clients doing amazing things with it these days.
HTH,
Chris
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by:SAMIR BHOGAYTA
ID: 35023874
   * The FIRST biggest difference: Transaction control. In Oracle EVERYTHING is a transaction and it is not permanent until you COMMIT. In SQL Server, there is (by default) no transaction control. An error half way through a stored procedure WILL NOT ROLLBACK the DDL in previous steps.

Obviously, if you wrap the TSQL DML in BEGIN TRANSACTION and COMMIT then it will roll back but this is rare in SQL Server code I've seen.

    * The SECOND biggest difference: MVCC. In SQL Server and Oracle is different. SQL Server will allow dirty reads, and writes can block reads in MS SQL (Again, it's configurable but the default in SQL Server is for performance and not read consistency, unlike Oracle where read consistency is default and unbendable.
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by:informaniac
ID: 35024594
To the asker: Wht is ur requirement when u say database.
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by:Kalpesh Chhatrala
ID: 35046519
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