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Wireless Network Advice

Hey everyone,

I am looking for some network gurus to give me some advice on my enterprise wireless network.  My manager wants it to be a "mesh" network so we can have seamless access to the network and access points if you move between floors or coverage areas.

The current configuration is a Cisco router WRT600N and 4 Cisco WAP4410N access points.  The access points are all set to the same SSID and channel (auto).  The router has a separate SSID and wireless network.

We can connect to the access points and network on all 3 floors.  On one of our floors we have two access points.  Currently once it connects to the network it will stay connected to the initial access point.  Is there any way to configure it so that the network card will move over to the access point with the best signal after it connects?  I haven't really found any solutions without buying a controller for the network.  Thank you!
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schu1tz
Asked:
schu1tz
1 Solution
 
lloydclintonCommented:
You will want to take a look at Cisco wireless lan controllers.  They are not cheap, but you can accomplish what you are looking for.  The APs you are currently using probably aren't supposed on a WLC as they appear to be Linksys/Cisco SoHo APs.  A WLC 2106 will allow 6 APs (we use 1141n aps).  You can configure roaming, authentication, and more with a WLC.  Plus the WLC will increase the security of your wireless setup.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps7221/index.html

You can get the controller list for about $1600 w/smartnet
APs are about $500 list.  

You can get power bricks for PoE for the APs and the 2106 does come with some PoE ports.
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schu1tzAuthor Commented:
Thanks!
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