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2008 File share issue

Posted on 2011-03-03
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
Hi,

this is a really straight forward question however i cant get my head around it due to not having done it for ages.

I have a Windows 2008 storage server with a folder that has been shared. this folder contains sub folders which can only be accessed by management and a specified department:

i.e folder A is accessible by dept A and management, folder B by department B and management ETC.

I know of 2 ways i can do this already by either A) giving read share permissions to the root folder and then explicitly allowing / denying access based on the group at the NTFS level however i know this is not best practice. the other obvious but laborious way would be to create an individual share for each folder.

any other ideas?
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Question by:gregan_plc
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Author Comment

by:gregan_plc
ID: 35031672
i should note that it is preferred that the root folders accessible by all, and the sub folders only accessible to their individual depts
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LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:connectex
ID: 35032028
Typically you'd create one share giving everyone the maximum rights that would be needed. Then secure at the folder or file level by using NTFS permisssions.
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Accepted Solution

by:
kevinhsieh earned 125 total points
ID: 35032050
Normal practice is to give change or full control at the share level. I then five users read at the NTFS level and give groups additional permissions on sub folders as appropriate. If the folder also requires that permissions are more restrictive than the parent I remove inherited permissions and then explicitly apply the correct ones.

Another way to do it is to no to the advanced NTFS permissions and apply read permissions to the parent folder but them make that only apply to itself and files, not subfolders. You would then apply all of the subfolder permissions.
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Author Comment

by:gregan_plc
ID: 35032418
thanks, was an inherited permissions omission, cheers!
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