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Troubleshooting client/server connectivity

Posted on 2011-03-03
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
Hi

I have an application, App1, running on Windows 2008 Server, Server1.
I also have client, Client1 on 192.168.1.1,  trying to access this app who keeps getting a 'server timeout' error.

The client is trying to connect to Server1 on port 500 (example).

The client can't ping Server1, and also telnet Server1 on port 500. But I was wondering if there was any command I could run on the server to show it had accepted a connection from the client on port 500.

I've heard of Netstat etc, but the server is accepting connections from thousands of different IP addresses. Is there a way to filter Netstat to show that there was an open connection from 192.168.1.1 on port 500?
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Question by:kam_uk
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Expert Comment

by:rawinnlnx9
ID: 35032100
Use this to get things straightened out on your network. It's very difficult for us to have visibility but you can with this:

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=89811747-c74b-4638-a2d5-ac828bdc6983&displaylang=en
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by:kam_uk
ID: 35044242
Thanks, do you know the answer to this question:

> Is there a way to filter Netstat to show that there was an open connection from 192.168.1.1 on port 500?
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Expert Comment

by:Qlemo
ID: 35304954
CurPorts (www.nirsoft.net/utils/cports.html) is an easy-to-use tool for real-time observing open and listening ports, like netstat does, but it can also log ports based on a filter.
Another useful tool is Process Monitor (www.sysinternals.com), which can do much more than just logging TCP/UDP connections, again based on filter conditions.
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by:kam_uk
ID: 35426775
Anyone know the answer to this:

I've heard of Netstat etc, but the server is accepting connections from thousands of different IP addresses. Is there a way to filter Netstat to show that there was an open connection from 192.168.1.1 on port 500?
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Accepted Solution

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Qlemo earned 500 total points
ID: 35428540
So you do not want to use another tool? Well, you can use netstat and build-in commands then - but keep in mind that you can't see whether that connection has been open in the past, but isn't anymore:
    netstat -n | find "192.168.1.1" | find ":500 "
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