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Windows 7  32 bit vs 64 bit

Posted on 2011-03-04
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we have these two options to go . why we need to select 32 bit over 64 bit ?
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Question by:cur
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by:pankaj0079
ID: 35034878
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Umar Topia earned 21 total points
ID: 35034899
If you want higher performance then you should go with 64 bit
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by:Fayaz
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ID: 35034939
If your hardware supports 64 bit then go for it and get better performance.
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by:Nik
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ID: 35034970
I'd suggest x64 as you will get a better performance and would be able to use more than 3.2GB of RAM.
You don't have to worry about the drivers for x64, drivers are not an issue anymore for 64-bit systems.
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by:Corlie008
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Text from Gizmodo.com

Why Should I?
We explained what's so awesome about 64-bit in detail a couple months ago, but to recap in a single word: Memory. With 32-bit Windows, you're stuck at 4GB of RAM, and even then, you're only using about 3.3GB of it, give or take. With 64-bit, 4GB of RAM is the new minimum standard, and with 4GB, you can run tons of applications with zero slowdown. Windows 7 (and Vista for that matter) runs so beautifully with 4GB of RAM you'll wonder how you ever did with less. It makes your system more futureproof too, so you can take your system to 8GB, 32GB or even a terabyte, before too long.

Who Shouldn't Go 64-Bit?
If you're not planning on going to 4GB of RAM anytime soon, you might wanna hold back, since you need 4GB of RAM to take full advantage of 64-bit's memory management. That said, RAM is so disgustingly cheap right now, and has such an intense bang-to-buck ratio, you should definitely upgrade to 4GB if you haven't already. Anyone who runs specialized or older gear (see below) should probably not jump into 64-bit.

64-bit Sniggles
It's true that 64-bit Windows used to be dicey on the driver and compatibility front, but from Vista onward, it's typically nothing you have to worry about. Most new hardware has 64-bit drivers, and even though most applications aren't 64-bit native yet, 32-bit ones usually run just fine.

Still, the biggest issue is hardware. If a gadget doesn't have 64-bit drivers, it won't work with your 64-bit OS, since 32-bit drivers aren't supported. Most non-crusty gadgets should be okay. (Seriously, I've run 64-bit Vista for a year, and now Windows 7, and everything I've tested for Giz plugs in just fine.) But if you run legacy goods, it might be kinda sticky, and you should still double check your gear just to be safe.

There are a few software issues to look out for, too. Google's Chrome, for instance, doesn't play nice with Windows 7 64-bit for some people (like me). Adobe Flash doesn't run in 64-bit browsers, but that's not really a problem—you can just run the regular 32-bit browser instead. iTunes had problems with 64-bit versions of Windows in the past, too (granted, Apple's not the most fastidious Windows app developer out there). Most of these issues have been or will be resolved, but if you use specialized mission-critical software, definitely read up on its 64-bit compatibility.

Really, Go 64-Bit
The caveat section looks longer than the "DO IT" section, but really, you'll probably be just fine running 64-bit. A ton of other people will be 64-bit with this generation of OSes/hardware too, so you won't be alone. The benefits of oodles of RAM, given all the crap you're running simultaneously, are just too good to pass up, especially once more apps are 64-bit native. Besides, the more people that jump on the 64-bit Express, the faster developers will transition their apps to 64-bit, and any bumps in the road will be smoothed out. So don't just do it for yourself, do it for everyone.

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by:Neil Russell
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ID: 35034998
First of all you need to consider the hardware it will be running on! You dont say if these are new machines or old that you are upgrading.

Also bare in mind that although you will gain SOME performance increase by virtue of better system management (Memory etc)
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by:PowerEdgeTech
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Some very good general guidelines have been laid out so far as to the differences and the benefits.  If you tell us more about your environment, systems, configurations, applications ... maybe we can share more specifics that might help you make a decision.
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