Solved

T-SQL : Variables

Posted on 2011-03-04
8
390 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-11
Hi !

There's a part of the code from a report a run everyday that I can't understand.

	DECLARE @CRLD CHAR(2) = CHAR(13) + CHAR(10)
	DECLARE @LineBreak VARCHAR(10) = @CRLD + '<br />'

Open in new window


Can someone explain me the prupose of this.

Thank You !

-M
0
Comment
Question by:Rubicon2009
8 Comments
 
LVL 19

Expert Comment

by:amenkes
ID: 35036499
It appears you are storing a variable @CRLD as 2 characters, a carriage return and a line feed.
The 2nd variable @LineBreak adds the first variable plus an HTML break for output to the web.
0
 
LVL 7

Accepted Solution

by:
tlovie earned 125 total points
ID: 35036521
What it does is declare a @CRLD as a CHAR(2), and assigns the ascii values chr(13) and chr(10) to it (CR + LF)
then it does the same for @LineBreak, it defines it as a varchar(10) and assigns the value of @CRLD concatenated with '<br />'

0
 

Author Comment

by:Rubicon2009
ID: 35036523
Butt how is it possible to store 23 characters in a 2 characters space ?
0
PRTG Network Monitor: Intuitive Network Monitoring

Network Monitoring is essential to ensure that computer systems and network devices are running. Use PRTG to monitor LANs, servers, websites, applications and devices, bandwidth, virtual environments, remote systems, IoT, and many more. PRTG is easy to set up & use.

 
LVL 15

Assisted Solution

by:derekkromm
derekkromm earned 125 total points
ID: 35036532
char(13) and char(10) are 1 character each

char(13) represents a carriage return
char(10) represents a line feed

for example, do "select char(70)" in query analyzer and you'll get "F", a single character. 70 is the ascii representation of "F"
0
 
LVL 19

Assisted Solution

by:amenkes
amenkes earned 125 total points
ID: 35036534
It is not 23 characters. CHAR(2) is defining the storage type of 2 characters.

CHAR(13) is the ASCII code for a Carriage return, it is not 13 characters.
CHAR(10) is the ASCII code for Line Feed, not 10 characters.
0
 
LVL 18

Assisted Solution

by:deighton
deighton earned 125 total points
ID: 35036611
CHAR(2) means 'two character variable', but then very confusingly CHAR(13) + CHAR(10) means concatenate ASCII character 13 to ASCII character 10

CHAR has different meaning on each side
0
 

Author Comment

by:Rubicon2009
ID: 35036618
Thank you ! I'm very surprised, I was not expecting this kind of logic at all.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:Rubicon2009
ID: 35036642
Thank a lot !
0

Featured Post

Migrating Your Company's PCs

To keep pace with competitors, businesses must keep employees productive, and that means providing them with the latest technology. This document provides the tips and tricks you need to help you migrate an outdated PC fleet to new desktops, laptops, and tablets.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Title # Comments Views Activity
SQL date incremented 11 31
Whats wrong in this query - Select * from tableA,tableA 11 31
SQL Query assistance 16 27
sql server query 6 9
JSON is being used more and more, besides XML, and you surely wanted to parse the data out into SQL instead of doing it in some Javascript. The below function in SQL Server can do the job for you, returning a quick table with the parsed data.
Ever needed a SQL 2008 Database replicated/mirrored/log shipped on another server but you can't take the downtime inflicted by initial snapshot or disconnect while T-logs are restored or mirror applied? You can use SQL Server Initialize from Backup…
Via a live example combined with referencing Books Online, show some of the information that can be extracted from the Catalog Views in SQL Server.
Viewers will learn how to use the SELECT statement in SQL to return specific rows and columns, with various degrees of sorting and limits in place.

809 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question