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Convert filename to FolderItem Object?

Posted on 2011-03-04
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
Is there a way to convert a filename (string) to a FolderItem Object?
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Question by:deleyd
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3 Comments
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:rawinnlnx9
ID: 35038338
Here you go: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/314008/c-programatically-using-a-string-as-object-name-when-instantiating-an-object

The green reply is the answer and it works just fine. You don't need to use an array. Just put your string in for the array(i) value.
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Author Comment

by:deleyd
ID: 35046824
I couldn't quite follow. I should be more specific. To get a list of all files in a directory tree, including files in subdirectories, I can do:
            string[] files = Directory.GetFiles(@"C:\Users\Public\My Music",
                "*.*",
                SearchOption.AllDirectories);

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which is nice and easy and fast, one line of code. (Except it also gives me hidden system files, which I really don't want. Is there a way to say don't include hidden system files?)

But to get a FolderItem Object for a file I have to do:
            DirectoryInfo source = new DirectoryInfo(@"C:\Users\Public\My Music");
            Shell32.Folder folder = shell.NameSpace(source.FullName);
            foreach (FileInfo fi in source.GetFiles())
            {
                Shell32.FolderItem fileItem = folder.ParseName(fi.Name);
                value = folder.GetDetailsOf(fileItem, Shell32File_TrackName_idx);

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which is a lot of work, plus this only gives me the files in one directory, I have to manually traverse the directory tree structure to get all files.

So I wondered if there was a quick short cut way to get a fileItem from the file name I can easily get in the first example?
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LVL 33

Accepted Solution

by:
Todd Gerbert earned 500 total points
ID: 35061449
This example uses LINQ extension methods (which requires .Net 3.5) and the Enum.HasFlag method (which requies .Net 4.0).

The basic steps are get a DirectoryInfo object for the folder in question.  Call the EnumerateFiles() method to get a list of all FileInfo objects for the files in that folder and below.  Loop through the FileInfo's excluding items with Hidden or System attributes.

This mushes everything together in one line.
string[] fileList = new DirectoryInfo("C:\\some\\folder").EnumerateFiles("*", SearchOption.AllDirectories).Where(x => !x.Attributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.Hidden) && !x.Attributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.System)).Select(y => y.FullName).ToArray();

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This is basically the same thing, just written out with a longer syntax (and compatible with .Net 2.0):
static string[] ListFiles(string folderPath)
{
	List<string> fileList = new List<string>();
	DirectoryInfo folder = new DirectoryInfo(folderPath);
	foreach (FileInfo file in folder.EnumerateFiles("*", SearchOption.AllDirectories))
	{
		try
		{
			if ((file.Attributes & FileAttributes.Hidden) != FileAttributes.Hidden &&
			(file.Attributes & FileAttributes.System) != FileAttributes.System)
				fileList.Add(file.FullName);
		}
		catch { }
	}
	return fileList.ToArray();
}

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I believe you will need to manually enum each folder individually in order to catch exceptions when a folder is encountered to which you don't have access.
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