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Dual Networks cards / connecting to seperate networks

Posted on 2011-03-04
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I have a single pc with 2 ethernet cards (call then A & B).  The computer is running Windows XP Pro.  I have connected each ethernet card to a seperate network.  Ethernet A is set to DHCP and Ethernet B has a static IP Address.  Ethernet A get an DHCP address of: 1.1.0.206 (IP), 255.0.0.0 (SM), 1.1.0.1 (DG).  Ethernet B is static is: 1.34.67.2 (IP), 255.0.0.0 (SM).  

I can ping all deives on Ethernet A, but cannot ping anything on Ethernet B.  There are only currenty two devices on B's network, both have 1.34.67.x ip addresses.  On of the devices is a switch that has its default gateway set to itself.

Can anyone tell me what I am doing wrong here that I cannot communicate with the devices on B?  Let me know if you need any other information?  Sorry if I left any important information out I am kind of new this Dual networks cards and seperate networks.
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Question by:PMCmikem
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5 Comments
 
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Accepted Solution

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Paul MacDonald earned 2000 total points
ID: 35039164
Since both NICS have a subnet mask of 255.0.0.0, they're on the same logical network.  Change the subnet mask of one or both in order for your setup to work.
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Author Closing Comment

by:PMCmikem
ID: 35039279
Thanks thats worked.  I hate to ask a dumb question, but can you explain why that worked?  You don't have to go into great detail, I just want to better understand the solution
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Author Comment

by:PMCmikem
ID: 35039295
Just to inform I chnaged the Subnet Mask on Network B to 255.255.0.0.  I can now ping both networks.
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LVL 34

Expert Comment

by:Paul MacDonald
ID: 35039313
The subnet mask defines what portion of the IP address identifies the network and what portion of the IP address defines the computer.

Your subnet mask (255.0.0.0) masked both IP addresses to network 1.0.0.0 so traffic to either network probably just went out the preferred NIC (NIC A).  Changing the subnet mask on NIC B (which is what I presume you did) pushed it to a different network number.  What that network number is depends on what subnet mask you used.
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LVL 34

Expert Comment

by:Paul MacDonald
ID: 35039319
Right, okay so now network A is 1.0.0.0 and network B is 1.34.0.0.  Two different network numbers.
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