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file size

Posted on 2011-03-04
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Last Modified: 2012-06-22
Hi,

How can I get the file size of all the files starting feb 2, 2011 up to feb 8, 2011?

Cheers!
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Question by:mikesteven
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by:alphabet26
ID: 35039441
as a sum of the file sizes or just display them?
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by:Tomun
ID: 35039500
Try this:
find . -maxdepth 1 -type f  -newermt "2011-02-02 00:00" ! -newermt "2011-02-07 23:59" -exec /usr/bin/du -ch {} +

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you might need to change the path to du (which du) to find it.
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by:mikesteven
ID: 35039861
yes please, as a sum
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by:Tomun
ID: 35039924
The sum is at the bottom of the output of the command I gave. It may not work if there are too many matching files though as it passes them all as arguments to du and you might run into the maximum command line length.

Remove the -maxdepth 1 if you want to look in subdirectories too.
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by:mikesteven
ID: 35040769
Tomun, there's gonna be like 6,000 files matching will that work?
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Tomun earned 2000 total points
ID: 35040892
II think it'll split the command into multiple lines if it's too long so add a "| grep total$" to the end to show only the totals and if you get more than one total you'll just have to add them together.

Here it is in full (I fixed an issue with the dates too).

find . -maxdepth 1 -type f  -newermt "2011-02-01 23:59:59" ! -newermt "2011-02-07 23:59:59" -exec /usr/bin/du -ch {} +|grep total$

Open in new window


The dot after the find command means the current directory, change that if you want to look somewhere else.

If that's not good enough there may be a better way to do it, but it might be more than a one liner. Try it and see how you get on.
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