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MSA P2000

Posted on 2011-03-04
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
We have a HP MSA P2000 G3 SAS. Will be using it to host ESX VMDK files
12 - 1 Tb drives

Looking for best practice.
Option 1: 1 vDisk with a RAID 5 (11TB) or RAID 6 (10 TB) , then create 2TB Volumes
Option 2: 2 vDisk with RAID 5 (5 TB each) then create my volumes.
Option 3: What would you suggest

Not sure which will give me the best performance, was looking for ideas.
All ideas are appreciated.

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Question by:EnriquePhoenix
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andyalder earned 250 total points
ID: 35040266
12 disks is too many for RAID 5, the likelihood of a second failure during the slow rebuild process is too great. RAID 6 or RAID 50 would give better protection but both are slow on writes. I'd go for RAID 10 as that;s the best performing, especially as you've got relatively slow disks.

Nice to see someone using the SAS attached flavour rather than iSCSI or fibre channel.
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Assisted Solution

by:coolsport00
coolsport00 earned 250 total points
ID: 35043882
RAID5s certainly won't give you best performance, if that's what you're after. Concur with "andyalder"...go with RAID10, then make sure you keep your LUNs under 2TB (2TB-512MB) for your datastores.

Regards,
~coolsport00
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Author Comment

by:EnriquePhoenix
ID: 35043960
So I should leave it as one big vdisk raid 10 then create my volumes? I am going to test this before I put it into production, but if I lost a drive everything should run fine while its rebuilding?
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by:coolsport00
coolsport00 earned 250 total points
ID: 35043979
Well, you don't need to...you can create 2 RAID10s, but you lose 4 disks of storage, so either 1 RAID10 or 2. Just depends on your storage needs vs performance needs which route you're able/willing to take. Yes, if you lose a drive (or 2), everything should run while rebuilding on new disks.

Regards,
~coolsport00
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by:andyalder
andyalder earned 250 total points
ID: 35045952
Two vdisks would be better than one, that way the controllers own one each assuming you're not gambling with a single controller model.
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Author Closing Comment

by:EnriquePhoenix
ID: 35086755
Thanks, guess I will test Raid 5 and 10 to see if there is a big difference in speed.
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