special characters in linux - when is \t a tab or the time


I'm not sure in linux how the difference between special characters work. When is \t a tab or the time. If i wanted to output a tab i could write

echo $'\t'

but if i wanted to set the shell prompt to show the time i would write


Why are they treated differently when both times i am creating a string?

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ravenplConnect With a Mentor Commented:
This is all about bash(shell) and how it handles the special characters.

You can
echo "\t" # displays \t
echo -e "\t" # displays tab
but PS1='\t' # uses time in prompt

So again, You always have to refer manual/documentation to find how an application handles special or escaped characters.
There's no such thing like \t always means tabulator.
which shell are you using?
Brian UtterbackConnect With a Mentor Principle Software EngineerCommented:
It depends on the context. There are no "universal" special characters. The C programming language defines a number of special characters that have become sort of defacto standards, primarily because much of the programs involved in the OS are written in either C or C++. But those special characters in C are defined only for character constants in programs and for certain output routines. It doesn't happen automatically in any string.

So, how special characters are handled on input depends on the program getting the input (also on the tty device driver if input is from a terminal). So, in this case the characters "\" and "t" are both actually stored in the string input. In the case of the bash shell, it is assigned to the PS1 variable as is, with no translation. Then, as part of the shell output routine, when it sees the "\t" in the prompt variable, instead of outputing the "\t", it outputs the current time.

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