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INSERT INTO tablename gives error

Posted on 2011-03-05
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I have two out of five of my tables in a MS Access database not allowing an INSERT INTO statement.  It gives me the error:

 The Insert Into statement contains the following unknown field name:  CurrMonthName.

My SQL statement goes something like this:
"Insert Into DataTable (CurrMonthName,CurrYear) Values (@CurrMonthName,@CurrYear);

I've tried deleting the table and re-creating it.  I removed the CurrMonthName field in the statement so it's just asking for CurrYear, and I still get the same error, except of course it says the unknown field name = CurrYear.  I've also tried inserting the data directly from an Append Query in MS Access, and that won't work either.

Any ideas of what I'm doing wrong?
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Question by:Agent909
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7 Comments
 
LVL 75
ID: 35044540
Here is the general syntax:

INSERT INTO Table2 ( FIELD1, FIELD2 )
SELECT Table1.FIELD1, Table1.FIELD2
FROM Table1;

Not sure about you @ symbols ...

mx
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Author Comment

by:Agent909
ID: 35044616
This is my code, and it works for my other forms:
I will try the code you posted, and get back to you.  Thank you!


str = "INSERT INTO DataTraffic " & _
                    "(CurrMonthName,CurrYear,StoreName,Traffic) " & _
                    "VALUES (" & _
                    "@CurrMonthName,@CurrYear,@StoreName,@Traffic)"
                    myCommand = New OleDbCommand(str, myConnection)
                    myCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@CurrMonthName", obj3.CurrMonthName)
                    myCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@CurrYear", obj3.CurrYear)
                    myCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@StoreName", obj3.StoreName)
                    myCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Traffic", obj3.Traffic)

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0
 
LVL 75
ID: 35044622
What is this:

myCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue

?

Are you sure this in Access SQL ?
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LVL 1

Author Comment

by:Agent909
ID: 35044665
yes, I'm using it in Access SQL. The OleDbCommand has .Parameters and .AddWithValue.
0
 
LVL 75
ID: 35044675
Sorry ... not really familiar with OleDb ...

Someone will be along ...

mx
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LVL 84

Accepted Solution

by:
Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE ) earned 500 total points
ID: 35044924
The syntax you're working with is more SQL Server or Oracle based (think Stored Procedures). Access doesn't work that way.

To run your Insert statement, just issue it directly:

sSQL = "Insert Into DataTable (CurrMonthName,CurrYear) Values ('" & obj3.CurrMonthName & "','" & obj3.CurrYear & "')"
YourConnection.Execute sSQL

If CurrYear is Numeric, you don't need the single quotes around those values.

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Author Closing Comment

by:Agent909
ID: 35044941
Thank you!
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