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tunnel adapter local area connection

Posted on 2011-03-06
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
Just did an IPCONFIG /ALL and saw a bunch of these...what I can gather is that they have something to do with IPV6 but was just wondering in an english answer what they are used for.  

Does having them on your system make it more vulnerable?

Are they created every time you connect to a different network?
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Question by:AJJ36
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by:asidu
ID: 35045975
IPV6 is the newer protocol used for networks.
As the current IP address which support IPV4 are not able to provide more ip address for users.

At the present time back end network equipment support ipV4.
Slowly there would be a shift towards the use-age of IPV6.
 

<<Does having them on your system make it more vulnerable?>>
No

<<Are they created every time you connect to a different network?>>
If you use DHCP settings, new address will be created when you connect to a
different network.
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Accepted Solution

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Ernie Beek earned 2000 total points
ID: 35046234
When you type the netsh interface ipv6 show interface command for Windows Server 2003, Windows XP with SP2, or Windows XP with SP1, you see a list of all of the IPv6 interfaces:


Interface index 1 is a pseudo-interface that is used for loopback (named the Loopback Pseudo-Interface).
Interface index 2 is a pseudo-interface that is used for the Intra-Site Automatic Tunnel Addressing Protocol (ISATAP) IPv6 transition technology (named the Automatic Tunneling Pseudo-Interface).
Interface index 3 is a pseudo-interface that is used for 6to4 tunneling (named the 6to4 Tunneling Pseudo-Interface).
Other interfaces are numbered sequentially in the order in which they are created. This order varies among computers.

With the exception of the Loopback Pseudo-Interface, your interfaces might be different. The link-local address of a LAN interface uses the IPv6 interface identifier derived from the Ethernet MAC address, as described in the "How is the link-local address derived?" question in this article.


IPv6 in Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 uses the "Automatic Tunneling Pseudo-Interface" for encapsulating IPv6 packets with an IPv4 header so that they can be sent across an IPv4 network. By default, IPv6 configures a link-local Intra-Site Automatic Tunnel Addressing Protocol (ISATAP) address on the Automatic Tunneling Pseudo-Interface. The link-local ISATAP address has the form fe80::200:5efe:w.x.y.x or fe80::5efe:w.x.y.x, in which w.x.y.x is an IPv4 address assigned to the computer.

Got this from: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/network/cc987595.aspx
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