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Adjusting Image in 'Crop' mode in Photoshop CS3

I am usually able to adjust any image e.g. for perspective by moving the placeholders in crop mode.  In this mode a single arrow shows when I drag the individual placeholder before cropping.

For some reason my computer is now only allowing me to adjust an entire vertical or horizontal place. Interestingly there is a double headed arrow that shows as opposed to the single arrow as stated above.

I recently reset Photoshops preferences to 'default' which may help explain things to the experts.

Specifically, I am trying (see attached image) to adjust the crop to allow for the converging lines of the pillars so the pillars are now straight.

Can anyone help?
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davidascott
Asked:
davidascott
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1 Solution
 
davidascottAuthor Commented:
Sorry - see image now attached Image to Crop
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davidascottAuthor Commented:
I have tried using the 'free transform' tool but this adjusts the overall persepective so I end up with being able to 'square up' one column but not the other.
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jeremyjared74Commented:
If you are using the crop tool to do the adjustments, you can remove any dimension settings in the top toolbar with the Crop tool selected. This will allow you to adjust the cropped area any way you want. I'm not sure you will be able to straighten the columns on both sides without distorting the picture though. Unless the picture is taken from dead center of the columns you will have a natural angle on one or the other columns.

Let me know if I am missing your point.
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davidascottAuthor Commented:
Thanks for this.  I have also ticked the perspective box which now allows that adjustment that I was looking for.  Thanks again.
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David BruggeCommented:
> I'm not sure you will be able to straighten the columns on both sides without distorting the picture though.

Oh ye of little faith... .
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jeremyjared74Commented:
Nice!

I was speaking from personal experience. I ran into a similar issue on an entry for a building. The company I was working for wanted me to take an image they had of one of their entries and "do something with it". I decided to show how they took the job from blueprint to completion, so I proposed a design that combined the AutoCad drawing with the picture of the finished product. They loved the idea, so it was up to me to pull it off. It was from a much further distance and looking down, so it wasn't possible without distorting. I decided to tweak the AutoCad drawing to match the building, which turned out to be a pain. I didn't know AutoCad well enough to use it, so I brought it into Illustrator and did a Live Trace to vectorize it. I then proceeded to manually tweak the lines one at a time. I have since learned a better method (Envelope>create with mesh). Anyway, good job.
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David BruggeCommented:
@jeremy,

I was just pulling your chain. Yes, I too have been through "image conversion hell" where you discover that no matter how much you push and pull the pixels, you just can't see around the corners.
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davidascottAuthor Commented:
I have to say that the finished product does not noticeably distort the image.  Correction of the coverging lines does the trick admirably, even for the artist that the image modification was for!!
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