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CPU Installation

Posted on 2011-03-07
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I'm installing a new CPU (i7-950) in my Asus Sabertooth X58. This is my first build and I don't want to break anything.

I've got the CPU sitting in the socket on the board, I'm about to close the lock, but it seems really tight. The CPU is sitting in perfectly. I didn't push it down. It fits like a glove. I'm just nervous about pushing the locking arm down because it seems crazy tight. Should it be really tight?
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Question by:mmoore500
6 Comments
 
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Lee W, MVP earned 167 total points
ID: 35062692
Without being the one doing it I can't (and I don't see how anyone else can) be definitely certain you've done everything properly, but in general, yes, it should be VERY tight so that the heat sink and fan can properly cool the processor.
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Expert Comment

by:xchange
ID: 35062715
If the lever feels TOO tight you may have a faulty motherboard socket.
Does the resistance feel the same WITHOUT the CPU in place?
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Author Comment

by:mmoore500
ID: 35062730
I know what you mean about not really being able to tell. I'm pretty sure I'm just being overly cautious. I know the CPU is in the socket correctly. With the grooves on the socket and slots on the CPU, there is no other way it could fit.

I'll wait to award points until I get it running in a bit.
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Assisted Solution

by:xchange
xchange earned 167 total points
ID: 35062738
leew, I believe he means the CPU locking lever not the cooling complex locking lever.

If the author can clarify this it would be nice.
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Assisted Solution

by:Reece Dodds
Reece Dodds earned 166 total points
ID: 35063494
the 1366 socket locking (cage) has slight movement back-and-forth to allow for slight adjustments in CPU die sizes.  Make sure that as you lower the cage over the CPU and start to apply pressure, the pressure is even rather than on the edge closest to the hinge.

When the CPU is sitting loosely in the socket, you can give it very slight lateral movement to make sure it is seated correctly.

If the cage pressure is even (looking), lock the lever down and put your cooler on.

The first (insert inuendo here) CPU lock is always a bit tight and on a new (to you) socket, always daunting.  
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Author Comment

by:mmoore500
ID: 35065782
It's alive!!! Thanks guys for your quick responses. It was just me being nervous I guess. Just spent a good chunk of change.
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