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Recover a file that was auto deleted on boot from /tmp folder

Posted on 2011-03-08
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
I wonder if anyone can help me I have been working on a perl script on a vyatta (debian based) router.
I foolishly saved the script to the /tmp folder.   When i have rebooted this file has been auto deleted
because of it's location.

Is there a way which i can recover this file?

many thanks
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Question by:Ross-C
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svs earned 500 total points
ID: 35068610
If /tmp is memory-based (using tmpfs filesystem), there's no chance to recover the file.

If it's not, it's still very hard.
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by:l4ncel0t
ID: 35068649
You have hardly any chance to restore it. But if you are using ext3 you can try that
http://www.linux.com/archive/feature/141074
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by:l4ncel0t
ID: 35068671
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Author Closing Comment

by:Ross-C
ID: 35068713
Thats what i thought, ah well you only do these things once.  Cheers anyway.
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