Solved

Finding the starting point of an open source program.

Posted on 2011-03-08
4
327 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-17
I have been tasked with extending the functionality of an open source database unit testing suite called DbFIT (http://gojko.net/fitnesse/dbfit and http://fitnesse.info/dbfit).
 
My experience with C# is from a website prospective.

I have the assemblies for DbFIT, how do I locate the starting point of the program/ project?

0
Comment
Question by:Mr_Shaw
  • 2
  • 2
4 Comments
 
LVL 52

Expert Comment

by:Carl Tawn
ID: 35068293
If it is an actual EXE application, rather than a DLL, you need to find the method called "main". That method is the entrypoint.
0
 

Author Comment

by:Mr_Shaw
ID: 35068426
using Red Gate's .NET Reflector I found the EXE.

When I loaded up the Project File it just gives me the following code.

What is my next move?



<VisualStudioProject>
  <CSHARP ProjectType="local" ProjectVersion="7.10.3077" SchemaVersion="2.0" ProjectGuid="f9ba497a-1c82-40bd-a252-0c1bf593d082">
    <Build>
      <Settings AssemblyName="TestRunner" DefaultClientScript="JScript" DefaultHTMLPageLayout="Grid" DefaultTargetSchema="IE50" DelaySign="false" OutputType="Exe">
        <Config Name="Debug" AllowUnsafeBlocks="true" DefineConstants="DEBUG;TRACE" DebugSymbols="true" IncrementalBuild="false" NoStdLib="false" Optimize="false" OutputPath="bin\Debug\" WarningLevel="4" />
        <Config Name="Release" AllowUnsafeBlocks="true" DefineConstants="TRACE" DebugSymbols="false" IncrementalBuild="false" NoStdLib="false" Optimize="true" OutputPath="bin\Release\" WarningLevel="4" />
      </Settings>
      <References>
        <Reference Name="fit" AssemblyName="fit" />
      </References>
    </Build>
    <Files>
      <Include>
        <File RelPath="AssemblyInfo.cs" SubType="Code" BuildAction="Compile" />
        <File RelPath="Global.cs" SubType="Code" BuildAction="Compile" />
        <File RelPath="TestRunner\TestRunnerMain.cs" SubType="Code" BuildAction="Compile" />
      </Include>
    </Files>
  </CSHARP>
</VisualStudioProject>

Open in new window

0
 
LVL 52

Accepted Solution

by:
Carl Tawn earned 500 total points
ID: 35068465
The <Include> section show you the source files included in the project. So, your entry point is going to be in either "Global.cs" or "TestRunnerMain.cs".
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:Mr_Shaw
ID: 35068968
thanks
0

Featured Post

3 Use Cases for Connected Systems

Our Dev teams are like yours. They’re continually cranking out code for new features/bugs fixes, testing, deploying, testing some more, responding to production monitoring events and more. It’s complex. So, we thought you’d like to see what’s working for us.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Entity Framework is a powerful tool to help you interact with the DataBase but still doesn't help much when we have a Stored Procedure that returns more than one resultset. The solution takes some of out-of-the-box thinking; read on!
Whether you've completed a degree in computer sciences or you're a self-taught programmer, writing your first lines of code in the real world is always a challenge. Here are some of the most common pitfalls for new programmers.
In this fourth video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFinfo utility, which retrieves the contents of a PDF's Info Dictionary, as well as some other information, including the page count. We show how to isolate the page count in a…
In this seventh video of the Xpdf series, we discuss and demonstrate the PDFfonts utility, which lists all the fonts used in a PDF file. It does this via a command line interface, making it suitable for use in programs, scripts, batch files — any pl…

863 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

20 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now