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Finding the starting point of an open source program.

Posted on 2011-03-08
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Last Modified: 2013-12-17
I have been tasked with extending the functionality of an open source database unit testing suite called DbFIT (http://gojko.net/fitnesse/dbfit and http://fitnesse.info/dbfit).
 
My experience with C# is from a website prospective.

I have the assemblies for DbFIT, how do I locate the starting point of the program/ project?

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Question by:Mr_Shaw
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4 Comments
 
LVL 52

Expert Comment

by:Carl Tawn
ID: 35068293
If it is an actual EXE application, rather than a DLL, you need to find the method called "main". That method is the entrypoint.
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Author Comment

by:Mr_Shaw
ID: 35068426
using Red Gate's .NET Reflector I found the EXE.

When I loaded up the Project File it just gives me the following code.

What is my next move?



<VisualStudioProject>
  <CSHARP ProjectType="local" ProjectVersion="7.10.3077" SchemaVersion="2.0" ProjectGuid="f9ba497a-1c82-40bd-a252-0c1bf593d082">
    <Build>
      <Settings AssemblyName="TestRunner" DefaultClientScript="JScript" DefaultHTMLPageLayout="Grid" DefaultTargetSchema="IE50" DelaySign="false" OutputType="Exe">
        <Config Name="Debug" AllowUnsafeBlocks="true" DefineConstants="DEBUG;TRACE" DebugSymbols="true" IncrementalBuild="false" NoStdLib="false" Optimize="false" OutputPath="bin\Debug\" WarningLevel="4" />
        <Config Name="Release" AllowUnsafeBlocks="true" DefineConstants="TRACE" DebugSymbols="false" IncrementalBuild="false" NoStdLib="false" Optimize="true" OutputPath="bin\Release\" WarningLevel="4" />
      </Settings>
      <References>
        <Reference Name="fit" AssemblyName="fit" />
      </References>
    </Build>
    <Files>
      <Include>
        <File RelPath="AssemblyInfo.cs" SubType="Code" BuildAction="Compile" />
        <File RelPath="Global.cs" SubType="Code" BuildAction="Compile" />
        <File RelPath="TestRunner\TestRunnerMain.cs" SubType="Code" BuildAction="Compile" />
      </Include>
    </Files>
  </CSHARP>
</VisualStudioProject>

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LVL 52

Accepted Solution

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Carl Tawn earned 500 total points
ID: 35068465
The <Include> section show you the source files included in the project. So, your entry point is going to be in either "Global.cs" or "TestRunnerMain.cs".
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Author Closing Comment

by:Mr_Shaw
ID: 35068968
thanks
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