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Visio 2010: Shapesheet of Copied Shape differs from Original

Posted on 2011-03-08
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Last Modified: 2012-06-27
Probably I am doing something wrong .......
When I copy a shape with a shapesheet as follows
 Shapesheet information of originalthen the shapesheet of the copy does not take over the referenced data
 Shapesheet information of copy
Is this a bug or is it a feature ?
Is there a way to copy shapes including the data on the shapesheet ?
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Question by:gpsfsc
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4 Comments
 
LVL 31

Accepted Solution

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Scott Helmers earned 2000 total points
ID: 35076749
The issue here that your original shape derives some of its properties from another shape.

At the top of the ShapeSheet window, notice that your original shape has an internal Visio name of "Sheet.6". (All Visio shapes have an internal name of Sheet.n, though the very first shape of any type on a page might be just "Sheet" and some shapes have other names in addition to the Sheet.n name.)

In the case of your Sheet.6, it derives its width from the width, height, and center point (located at the X/Y coordinates defined by PinX and PinY) from  "Sheet.1". When you copied Sheet.6 and not Sheet.1, your new shape, Sheet.18, no longer knows how to derive the values for width, height, PinX and PinY. REF() is ShapeSheet shorthand for illegal reference.

Was Sheet.6 part of a group? If so, Sheet.1 is probably the shape that is the group itself. Copying the group will create a copy of all grouped shapes as well.

Does this make sense in the context of your drawing?
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Author Comment

by:gpsfsc
ID: 35081198
Thanks scott for your comment
As you probably noticed, I am that familiar with visio yet.
Now I just noticed, that I can not find a shape called Sheet.1 anywhere in my document, but it seems to exist. Do you have an idea where to find hidden shapes? I think as soon as I have an understanding of this, things will become more clear ....
I'll attach the visio file for reference Sample.vsd
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LVL 31

Expert Comment

by:Scott Helmers
ID: 35082590
Thanks for including the clock sample. There aren't any hidden shapes, per se, but this is what I suspected in my initial response. Everything you see on the page is a shape -- each "hour" marking around the outside of the clock, the hands on the clock, etc. All of the subshapes have been grouped together to form the clock. It is the clock group that is shape.1. Consequently, many of the subshapes derive some of their properties from the group -- which is called "Clock" but whose internal name is Sheet.1.

If you want to see the component pieces, select the clock, right click, then select Group>Ungroup. Click past the warning message and the clock with "fall apart", i.e., many of the subshapes will drop to the lower left corner of the page because they no longer can get their positioning data from the group.
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Author Closing Comment

by:gpsfsc
ID: 35181891
Thanks scott for your comments
They helped me a lot to get a bit deeper into Visio ..

Regards
gpsfsc
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