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perl link

Posted on 2011-03-08
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Last Modified: 2013-11-17
My perl should be usr/bin/perl and not /usr/local/bin/perl, what should I do to modify this.

root@csc06r11 # which perl
/usr/local/bin/perl

My env is

MANPATH=/usr/man:/usr/autotree/autosys/doc
LANG=en_US
WSM_WS_CMD="startsrc -s http4websm"
VVTERMCAP=//vvtermcap
LOGIN=root
SQRTOOLS=/usr/sqr6/syb/bin
PAGER=pg
PATH=/usr/autotree/autosys/bin:/usr/bin:/usr/local/lib:/usr/local/bin:/sybase/ASE-12_0/bin:/sybase/OCS-12_0/bin:/usr/bin:/etc:/usr/sbin:/usr/ucb:/usr/bin/X11:/sbin:/usr/java130/jre/bin:/usr/java130/bin
SQRDIR=/usr/sqr6/syb/bin
SYBPLATFORM=rs6000
ORACLE_BASE=/optware/oracle
AUTOSERV=LMQ
LC__FASTMSG=true
CGI_DIRECTORY=/var/docsearch/cgi-bin
LOGNAME=root
MAIL=/usr/spool/mail/root
LOCPATH=/usr/lib/nls/loc
PS1=[$PWD]
WSM_DOC_DIR="/usr/websm/http/com.ibm.websm.http.server_1.0.0"
DOCUMENT_SERVER_MACHINE_NAME=localhost
USER=root
DSQUERY=prodlmdb
AUTHSTATE=files
DEFAULT_BROWSER=netscape
SHELL=/usr/bin/ksh
ODMDIR=/etc/objrepos
DOCUMENT_SERVER_PORT=49213
HOME=/
AUTOUSER=/usr/autotree/autouser
TERM=xterm
MAILMSG=[YOU HAVE NEW MAIL]
ORACLE_HOME=/optware/oracle/product/9.2.0/db_1
PWD=/usr/opt
DOCUMENT_DIRECTORY=/usr/docsearch/html
TZ=EST5EDT
WSM_CGI_DIR=
A__z=! LOGNAME
NLSPATH=/usr/lib/nls/msg/%L/%N:/usr/lib/nls/msg/%L/%N.cat
LIBPATH=/usr/lib:/usr/local/lib:.:
LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/usr/lib:/usr/local/lib:/optware/oracle/product/11.1.0/client_1/


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Question by:mnis2008
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4 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:svs
ID: 35071374
If you have root access, run  
ln -s /usr/local/bin/perl /usr/bin/perl

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Author Comment

by:mnis2008
ID: 35071406
How do I actually set it in my enviroment such that it searches for perl in /usr/bin and not in /usr/local/bin
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Author Comment

by:mnis2008
ID: 35071413
I need to link /usr/bin/perl to /usr/opt/perl5/bin/perl5.8.2_64bit
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Accepted Solution

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arnold earned 500 total points
ID: 35072021
You can redefine the $PATH $path variable depending on your shell.
This is the search path
echo $PATH
echo $path
The search is from left to right.
changing the order of entries will change where an item that exists in two places is located
PATH=/usr/bin:/usr/local/bin:$PATH
will mean that when you run perl, /usr/bin/perl will be found versus /usr/local/bin/perl.
alternatively, if for what you want to do, you must use /usr/bin/perl, use /usr/bin/perl Makefile.PL

you could add /usr/opt/perl5/bin/ as the first entry in the $PATH
export PATH=/usr/opt/perl5/bin:$PATH
presumably there is a perl within that location that links to perl5.8.2_64bit.
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