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Authorative domains, Remote domains and Internal Relay domains

Posted on 2011-03-08
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Last Modified: 2012-05-11
Confused!

In Exchange 2007 > Org Config > Hub Transport > Remote Domains, I have the following listed:

Name: MyDomain.com
Domain: *.MyDomain.com

Name: Partner1.com
Domain: Partner1.com

Name: OldDomain.com
Domain: *.OldDomain.com

Then, if I go to Accepted Domains

Name: MyDomain.com
Accepted Domain: MyDomain.com
Type: Authorative

Name: OldDomain.com
Accepted Domain: OldDomain.com
Type: Authorative

Name: Contoso.com
Accepted Domain: Contoso.com
Type: Internal Relay

Questions:

1. Does this mean my Exchange org 'owns' MyDomain.com and OldDomain.com?

2. What's the status of Partner1.com

3. What's the status of Contoso.com

4. I know people in the company send emails to mailbox@japan.olddomain.com. Does Exchange own japan.olddomain.com as well? I notice that in Remote Domains, one of the Domain names was *.olddomain.com

5. If I had a domain name (e.g. example.com) is there an easy way to find out if Exchange own this domain, or it is an external one?
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Question by:bruce_77
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ccns earned 2000 total points
ID: 35073286
seems like those domains are domains which you will relay email to. as you would be the "bridgehead server" and relay to the other ones.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa996309.aspx

You can create remote domain entries to define the settings for message transfer between the Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 organization and domains outside your Active Directory forest. When you create a remote domain entry, you control the types of messages that are sent to that domain. You can also apply message format policies and acceptable character sets for messages that are sent from users in your organization to the remote domain. The settings for remote domains are global configuration settings for the Exchange organization.
The remote domain settings are applied to messages during categorization. When recipient resolution occurs, the recipient domain is matched against the configured remote domains. If a remote domain configuration blocks a specific message type from being sent to recipients in that domain, the message is deleted. If you specify a particular message format for the remote domain, the message headers and content are modified. Information about the remote domain configuration is stored in Active Directory. The settings apply to all messages that are processed by the Exchange organization.
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by:bruce_77
ID: 35073400
Thanks, which domains are you referring to, all of them?

Do you know the answers to the listed questions I had so it's clearer for me? :)
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Expert Comment

by:ccns
ID: 35073857
Questions:

1. yes, this means these are owned by your company and are child domains of the first. which means they would be within your network.
2. trace the IP address see if its within your network or at a branch network.
3. trace the IP address see if its within your network or at a branch network.
4. child domain so yes your company would own it but as i said also it maybe at a branch office or hidden away somewhere in another office.
5. if it is listed in your exchange server then you would generally "own" or have authorisation to the domain.
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